College of Staten Island

Graduate Catalog 2014-2015

Appendix

Appendix i

CSI Library Guidelines for Submission of the Master's Thesis

A finished Master's thesis is a scholarly work that is the product of extensive research and related preparation. The Library will make Master's theses publicly available to students, faculty, and outside researchers. For purposes of preservation, and to prepare them for bindery, theses must adhere to uniform standards of format and construction.

Number of Copies

Students submitting their approved thesis to the Library are asked to submit two copies, both of which must be signed by all members of the thesis committee, or by the program coordinator if no committee exists, on the thesis signature page. One copy will be kept in the Library archives; the other will become part of the circulating collection. Students wishing to copyright their thesis through an official agency must make their own arrangements to do so. (See U.S. Copyright Office website http://www.copyright.gov/)

Format

The two copies for the Library must be printed on 8.5” x 11” unpunched, unbound white paper of 20-24 lb. weight or heavier. The paper must also meet the specification of 100% cotton content (i.e., acid free) and must not contain lines, smudges, spots, or shaded background. Copies from a laser printer or commercial copier service are highly recommended. Copies done on departmental or self-service copy machines do not meet the Library’s high-quality standard. All printing must be one side only.

Photographs, maps, charts, color copies, and some special illustrative materials may be placed, prepared, or reproduced on paper different from that of the regular text (for example, color copies on cotton paper will smudge; use paper specifically made for color copying). On either side of this special paper, students must include a blank sheet of the specified cotton, acid-free paper. Students also must place one extra sheet at the front and back of the thesis.

The following (minimum) margins must be used throughout the manuscript:

Left margin:

1.5”

Top margin:

1.0”

Right margin:

1.0”

Bottom margin:

1.0”

Material that cannot fit within regular or oversized margin requirements may be placed on 11” x 17” paper. Page numbers on these oversized pages must be placed in the upper right corner in the same position as the rest of the text. These pages are not to be folded prior to submittal. The bindery will fold them as appropriate.

Abstract

Abstracts must be double-spaced and are limited to a single page with margins as described above. This page should bear the heading “Thesis Abstract.”

Submission

After a successful thesis defense the student should submit two official copies of the manuscript to the Library. If there are any concerns regarding the submission guidelines, the student may consult with the Head of Reference (718.982.4010) or the Archivist (718.982.4128). Either person will be available to ensure that the thesis meets the standards as described above.

Appendix ii - CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity

For information on the CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity please visit http://www.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/sa/policies/AcademicIntegrityPolicywithoutmemo.pdf.

Rights to Student Records

For information on the CUNY Policy on Rights to Student Records please visit www.csi.cuny.edu/currentstudents/FERPA.pdf.

Campus Behavior Code

For information on the CUNY Policy on Campus Behavior please visit http://www.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/sa/policies/BylawsFinalARTICLEXVSTUDENTSDec22Rev.pdf.

Campus Safety and Security

The main Campus Public Safety office is located in Building 2A, Room 108. Two satellite desks are located in the lobbies of the Campus Center and the Library. Campus Public Safety officers are on duty at the main gate and patrol the campus 24 hours a day. Emergency pull stations, identified by a blue light, are located throughout the campus, indoors and outdoors. The Office of Public Safety is charged with the maintenance of security and personal safety of all members of the College community and visitors while on campus. All students and members of the faculty and staff are required to have a valid, updated college identification card in their possession while on campus.

Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act

The Federal Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990 mandates that every college in the nation publicize the incidents of crime reported on its campus. Below are the incidents of crime reported at the College of Staten Island.

Crime

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter

0

0

0

0

0

Negligent Manslaughter

0

0

0

0

0

Robbery

2

0

0

0

0

Aggravated Assault

1

1

0

1

0

Motor Vehicle Theft

0

2

0

0

0

Arson

0

1

1

0

0

Burglary

0

1

5

2

11

Sex Offenses, Forcible

1

2

0

0

0

Sex Offenses, Non-Forcible

0

0

0

0

0

Liquor Law Arrests

0

0

0

0

0

Liquor Law Violation Referrals

1

0

0

0

0

Drug Law Arrests

0

0

0

0

0

Drug Law Violation Referrals

0

0

0

0

0

Illegal Weapons Possession Arrests

1

0

0

0

1

Illegal Weapons Possession Referrals

1

0

1

0

0

*Denote Report to other campus authorities. Hate Crimes Reported (none)

Faculty Report Form

It is necessary to complete this form to report an incident of suspected and/or resolved academic dishonesty. Make a copy for your records and forward the original, along with copies of all available supporting documentation, to the:

Office of the Academic Integrity Officer

[Fill in name of college]

Instructor Name:

Dept:_________________________ Tel.No:_______email:______________________

Course: ________________Section:_________________Semester: ________________

Student Name: _______________________________ Student ID#:________________

Date of Incident: ________________________________________________________

Type of Incident: ________Cheating ________Plagiarism _________Other

Description of Incident: ___________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

Did the student admit to the charge of cheating, plagiarism or other act of academic

dishonesty? Yes_____ No_____ Student could not be contacted _____

Explanation____________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

Explanation of recommended sanction _______________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

Signature of Faculty Member________________________________ Date_________

Resolution of the Case after Adjudication

Academic sanction _________________________________________

Disciplinary sanction ________________________________________

Signature of Academic Integrity Officer _______________________ Date__________

Immunization Requirement

New York State law requires that students attending postsecondary institutions be immunized against measles, mumps, and rubella. Specifically, all matriculated students born on or after January 1, 1957 must file a form with the Medical Office, signed by a physician, certifying immunity to these diseases prior to registering for more than five credits.

New York State Education Law Section 224-a

Students unable because of religious beliefs to register or attend classes on certain days:

  1. No person shall be expelled from or be refused admission as a student to an institution of higher education for the reason that he/she is unable, because of his/her religious beliefs, to register or to attend classes or to participate in any examination, study, or work requirements on a particular
    day or days.
  2. Any student in an institution of higher education who is unable, because of his/her religious beliefs, to register or attend classes on a particular day or days shall, because of such absence on the particular day or days, be excused from any examination or any study or work requirements.
  3. It shall be the responsibility of the faculty and of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to make available to each student who is absent from school, because of his/her religious beliefs, an equivalent opportunity to register for classes or to make up any examination, study, or work requirements which he/she may have missed because of such absence on any particular day or days. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for making available to the said student such equivalent opportunity.
  4. If registration, classes, examinations, study, or work requirements are held on Friday after four o'clock post meridian or on Saturday, similar or makeup classes, examinations, study, opportunity to register, or work requirements shall be made available on other days, where it is possible and practicable to do so. No special fees shall be charged to the student for these classes, examinations, study, registration, or work requirements held on other days.
  5. In effectuating the provisions of this section, it shall be the duty of the faculty and of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to exercise the fullest measure of good faith. No adverse or prejudicial effects shall result to any student because of his or her availing himself or herself of the provisions of this section.
  6. Any student, who is aggrieved by the alleged failure of any faculty or administrative officials to comply in good faith with the provisions of this section, shall be entitled to maintain an action or proceeding in the supreme court of the county in which such institution of higher education is located for the enforcement of his/her rights under this section.

    6-a. It shall be the responsibility of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to give written notice to students of their rights under this section, informing them that each student who is absent from school, because of his or her religious beliefs, must be given an equivalent opportunity to register for classes or make up any examination, study, or work requirements which he or she may have missed because of such absence on any particular day or days. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for making available to each student such equivalent opportunity.

As used in this section, the term "institution of higher education" shall mean any institution of higher education, recognized and approved by the regents of the University of the State of New York, which provides a course of study leading to the granting of a postsecondary degree or diploma. Such term shall not include any institution which is operated, supervised, or controlled by a church or by a religious or denominational organization whose educational programs are principally designed for the purpose of training ministers or other religious functionaries or for the purpose of propagating religious doctrines. As used in this section, the term "religious belief" shall mean beliefs associated with any corporation organized and operated exclusively for religious purposes, which is not disqualified for tax exemption under section 501 of the United States Code.

Non-Discrimination Policy

It is the policy of The College of Staten Island (“the College” or “CSI”) to recruit, employ, retain, promote, and provide benefits to employees and to admit and provide services for students without regard to:

  • race
  • color
  • creed
  • national origin
  • ethnicity
  • ancestry
  • religion
  • age
  • sex
  • sexual orientation
  • gender identity
  • marital status
  • legally registered domestic partnership status
  • disability
  • predisposing genetic characteristics
  • alienage
  • citizenship
  • military or veteran status
  • status as a victim of domestic violence

Sexual harassment, a form of sex discrimination, is prohibited under the College’s Policy Against Sexual Harassment.

Please access CSI’s complete Non-discrimination Policy: www.csi.cuny.edu/diversity_and_compliance/non_discrim.html

Definition of Discrimination

Discrimination is defined as treating members of a protected class less favorably because of their membership in that class. The protected groups are set forth in the College’s Non-Discrimination Policy (see above).

Harassment is a type of discrimination involving oral, written, graphic or physical conduct relating to an individual’s race, color, or national origin (including an individual’s ancestry, country of origin, or country of origin of the individual’s parents or other family member) or other protected characteristic that is sufficiently severe, pervasive, or persistent so as to interfere with or limit the ability of an individual to work for, participate in or benefit from the educational institution’s programs or activities.

Responsibilities of the College Community-at-large

Members of the College community, who become aware of allegations of discrimination including sexual harassment, should encourage the aggrieved individual to report the alleged act to the Office of Diversity and Compliance Director (“ODC Director”), who is also the Sexual Harassment Coordinator, 504/ADA Compliance Coordinator, and Title IX Coordinator.

The Director of Diversity and Compliance, Danielle Dimitrov, Esq., may be contacted by phone: (718) 982-2250, or email: danielle.dimitrov@csi.cuny.edu (Building 1A, Room 103).

Confidentiality

The privacy of individuals who bring complaints of discrimination, who are accused of discrimination, or who are otherwise involved in the complaint process should be respected, and information obtained in connection with the filing, investigation, or resolution of complaints should be handled as confidentially as possible. It is not possible, however, to guarantee absolute confidentiality and no promise of complete confidentiality should be made to College employees or students who are involved in the complaint process.

Making a Complaint of Discrimination

Any applicant for employment or individual who is employed by or enrolled at the College of Staten Island may file a complaint of discrimination. The College places a strong emphasis on prompt action to resolve complaints alleging discrimination. Members of the College community who believe they have been discriminated against or harassed are strongly encouraged to report allegations as promptly as possible. Delay in making a complaint may make it more difficult for a unit of the College to investigate the allegations.

The complaint procedure applies to all job applicants and employees and in some instances, former employees of CSI. Students employed by the College have the right to equal employment opportunity in their capacity as employees.

Sexual harassment, a form of sex discrimination, is prohibited under the College’s Policy Against Sexual Harassment. Members of the College community who believe they have been sexually harassed are strongly encouraged to report their allegations as promptly as possible to the ODC Director/Sexual Harassment Coordinator.

Whom to Contact

Any employee, applicant for employment, or student, may file a complaint of discrimination or sexual harassment. Individuals who believe they are being or have been discriminated against or harassed in violation of College policy are encouraged to contact, as soon as possible, the Office of Diversity and Compliance.

At the time the individual makes his or her complaint, the ODC Director should provide the complainant with the complaint form and with information about the various internal and external mechanisms through which the complaint may be filed.

Applicable Laws

The College of Staten Island adheres to federal, state, and city laws and regulations regarding non-discrimination and affirmative action including among others Section 1324b of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), Executive Order 11246, as amended, Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, Section 402 of the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, as amended, the Equal Pay Act of 1963, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, as amended and the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, the New York State Human Rights Law and the New York City Human Rights Law. The “protected classes,” as delineated in Executive Order 11246: (i.e. Black, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, American Indian/Alaskan Native and Women), were expanded on December 9, 1976 by the Chancellor of The City University of New York to include Italian-Americans. The U.S. Office of Management and Budget further expanded these protected classes in 2006 to include two or more races (not Hispanic or Latino) and replaced Asian/Pacific Islander, with Asian (not Hispanic or Latino) and Native Hawaiian (not Hispanic or Latino), Black was renamed as Black or African American (not Hispanic or Latino) and Hispanic was renamed Hispanic or Latino.

Policy And Procedures Concerning Sexual Assault, Stalking and Domestic and Intimate Partner Violence Against Students

Policy Statement

The City University of New York seeks to create and maintain a safe environment in which all members of the University community—students, faculty and staff—can learn and work free from the fear of sexual assault and other forms of violence. The University’s policies on Workplace Violence and Domestic Violence and the Workplace apply to all acts of violence that occur in the workplace or that may spill over into the workplace. The University’s Sexual Harassment Policy prohibits many forms of unwelcome conduct, including but not limited to, physical conduct of a sexual nature. This policy is specifically directed towards sexual assault, domestic and intimate partner violence and stalking committed against students on- and off-campus.

CUNY wants all victims of sexual assault, stalking and domestic and intimate partner violence to know that the University has professionals and law enforcement officers who are trained in the field to assist student victims in obtaining help, including immediate medical care, counseling and other essential services. If the alleged perpetrator is also a member of the CUNY community, the college will take prompt action to investigate, and, where appropriate, to discipline and sanction the alleged perpetrator. CUNY urges all victims to seek immediate help in accordance with the guidelines set forth in this policy with the assurance that all information received from a complaint will be handled as confidentially as possible.

In order to eliminate sexual assaults and other forms of violence perpetrated against students, and to create a safe college community, it is critical to provide an appropriate prevention education program and have trained professionals to provide vital supportive services.

Accordingly, CUNY is committed to the following goals:

  • Providing clear and concise guidelines for students to follow in the event that they or someone they know have been the victim of a sexual assault, domestic/intimate partner violence, or stalking.
  • Assisting victims of sexual assault or abuse in obtaining necessary medical care and counseling, whether on- or off-campus.
  • Providing the most informed and up-to-date education and information to its students about how to identify situations that involve sexual assault, domestic and intimate partner violence, or stalking, and ways to prevent these forms of violence.
  • Educating and training all staff members, including counselors, public safety officers and student affairs staff and faculty, to assist victims of sexual assault, domestic/intimate partner violence, or stalking.
  • Ensuring that disciplinary procedures are followed in the event that the alleged perpetrator is a CUNY student or employee.

    Procedures for Reporting Incidents of Sexual Assault and Other Forms of Violence

    Obtaining assistance after a student is sexually assaulted, stalked or is in an abusive relationship is extremely important and can involve different points of on-campus contact for students, faculty and staff, including the Public Safety Department, Women’s/Men’s Centers and Counseling Departments, and/or the Dean of Student Development/Student Affairs. Each provides different forms of assistance which together address many of the needs of survivors.

    Contact Law Enforcement Personnel Immediately

    CUNY urges any student who has been the victim of a sexual assault or other act of violence or abuse, or any student or employee who has witnessed a sexual assault or other act of violence against a student, to immediately report the incident to the college Public Safety Department if the attack occurred on-campus, or to call 911 or go to the local NYPD precinct if the incident took place off-campus. Each college shall be provided with a list of emergency contact numbers as part of its orientation and training programs.

    Seek Immediate Medical Attention

    It is critical that victims of a physical assault receive comprehensive medical attention as soon as possible. For a sexual assault in particular, immediate treatment and the preservation of evidence of the attack (i.e. retain the clothing worn during the attack and do not shower) is crucial to a criminal investigation. If a student believes that she/he may be the victim of date rape by being drugged, she/he should go directly to a hospital to receive a toxicology examination since such drugs only remain in a person’s system for a short period of time. In all other circumstances, public safety and police personnel can assist the victim in obtaining medical care. Each college shall be provided with a list of local hospitals, some of which are designated as SAFE (Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner) hospitals that are specially equipped to handle sexual assaults and are trained to gather minute evidence from such assaults. Rape crisis advocates at emergency rooms are also trained to handle domestic violence. EMS will be directed to bring victims to a SAFE hospital at their request. Medical attention is critical not only to treat internal and external injuries and to combat the possibilities of sexually transmitted infections and/or pregnancy, but also to collect evidence that can be used against the alleged perpetrator. It is also vital to ongoing safety and recovery that victims receive emotional support and professional counseling as soon as possible after the attack.

    Obtaining an On-Campus Advocate

    CUNY encourages student victims to contact the Dean of Student Affairs/Student Development to obtain assistance in accessing medical and counseling services, or to make any necessary changes to the student’s academic program or residential housing situation. Public Safety can assist victims getting to and from campus safely, filing a police report and obtaining an order of protection against the alleged perpetrator. Victims can also file a complaint with the College against an alleged perpetrator who is a student or employee of the University with the Dean of Student Affairs/Student Development and the Public Safety Office.

    Handling Sexual Assault, Stalking and Domestic and Intimate Partner Violence Complaints On-Campus

    The Colleges shall act promptly in response to information that a student has been sexually assaulted, or has been the victim of domestic or intimate partner violence or stalking by another member of the CUNY community. Upon receipt of a complaint, the College shall undertake an appropriate investigation. If it appears that there is sufficient evidence to warrant disciplinary charges against a student or staff member, such charges shall be brought pursuant to the appropriate University procedures or collective bargaining agreement. If the alleged perpetrator is a student and the matter is brought before a hearing, the victim and alleged perpetrator are entitled to the same opportunities to have others present and to be informed of the outcome of the proceedings. The victim is entitled to a report of the results of the proceeding at her/his request. If a student is found guilty of committing a sexual assault or other act of violence against another CUNY student or employee after a disciplinary hearing, the penalties may include suspension, expulsion from residence halls, or permanent dismissal from CUNY.

    In addition, if during the course of the investigation and/or disciplinary process the alleged perpetrator, or anyone on his/her behalf, seeks to contact the victim so as to harass, intimidate, threaten or coerce the victim in any way, the College reserves the right to bring additional disciplinary action against the actor. Such conduct by any member of the CUNY community will not be tolerated.

    Confidentiality

    The University recognizes that confidentiality is particularly important to victims of sex crimes, domestic and intimate partner violence and stalking. If the victim seeks counseling with a licensed professional and/or works with an advocate from the campus, those communications will be confidential. CUNY encourages victims in all circumstances to seek counseling in order to speak about her/his options and to begin the recovery period.

    While complete confidentiality cannot be guaranteed, every effort will be made to maintain confidentiality on a “need to know” basis. Generally, the wishes of a victim not to report a sexual assault or incident of domestic/intimate partner violence or stalking to the police will prevail, though the College reserves the right to notify the police when it believes that such reporting is necessary for the protection of the College community. Such notification, however, will generally be done without divulging the victim’s identity and for the purpose of providing a campus-wide safety alert. In addition, the College must adhere to legal mandates such as Title IX, medical reporting laws, and the Campus Security Act. For example, CUNY is required to make an annual report documenting the occurrences of violent crimes on campus, including sexual assault. However, this report does not include any information identifying the individuals (including the victims) linked to these crimes.

Policy Against Sexual Harrassment

It is the policy of The College of Staten Island ("the College" or "CSI") to promote a cooperative work and academic environment in which there exists mutual respect for all College students, faculty, and staff.  Harassment of employees or students based upon sex is inconsistent with this objective and contrary to the College’s Non-discrimination Policy.  Sexual harassment is illegal under Federal, State, and City laws, and will not be tolerated within the College.

Please access CSI’s complete Policy Against Sexual Harassment here: www.csi.cuny.edu/diversity and compliance/sexual harassment.html

Prohibited Conduct

It is a violation of College policy for any member of the College community to engage in sexual harassment or to retaliate against any member of the College community for raising an allegation of sexual harassment, for filing a complaint alleging sexual harassment, or for participating in any proceeding to determine if sexual harassment has occurred.

Definition of Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other oral or written communications or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:

  1. submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment or academic standing;
  2. submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as a basis for employment or academic decisions affecting such individual; or
  3. such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or abusive work or academic environment.

Sexual harassment can occur between individuals of different sexes or of the same sex. Although sexual harassment most often exploits a relationship between individuals of unequal power (such as between a faculty member and student, supervisor and employee, or tenured and untenured faculty members), it may also occur between individuals of equal power (such as between fellow students or co-workers), or in some circumstances even where it appears that the harasser has less power than the individual harassed (for example, a student sexually harassing a faculty member).  A lack of intent to harass may be relevant to, but will not be determinative of, whether sexual harassment has occurred.

Examples of Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment may take different forms.  Using a person's response to a request for sexual favors as a basis for an academic or employment decision is one form of sexual harassment.  Examples of this type of sexual harassment include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • requesting or demanding sexual favors in exchange for employment or academic opportunities (such as hiring, promotions, grades, or recommendations);
  • submitting unfair or inaccurate job or academic evaluations or grades, or denying training, promotion, or access to any other employment or academic opportunity, because sexual advances have been rejected.

Other types of unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature can also constitute sexual harassment, if sufficiently severe or pervasive that the target does find, and a reasonable person would find, that an intimidating, hostile or abusive work or academic environment has been created.  Examples of this kind of sexual harassment include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • sexual comments, teasing, or jokes;
  • sexual slurs, demeaning epithets, derogatory statements, or other verbal abuse;
  • graphic or sexually suggestive comments about an individual's attire or body;
  • inquiries or discussions about sexual activities;
  • pressure to accept social invitations, to meet privately, to date, or to have sexual relations;
  • sexually suggestive letters or other written materials;
  • sexual touching, brushing up against another in a sexual manner, graphic or sexually suggestive gestures, cornering, pinching, grabbing, kissing, or fondling;
  • coerced sexual intercourse or sexual assault.

Responsibilities of the College Community-At-Large

Members of the College community who become aware of allegations of sexual harassment should encourage the aggrieved individual to report the alleged sexual harassment to the Sexual Harassment Coordinator, a Deputy Coordinator or any member of the Awareness and Intake Committee.

The Sexual Harassment Coordinator and Director of Diversity and Compliance, Danielle Dimitrov, Esq., may be contacted by phone: (718) 982-2250, or email: danielle.dimitrov@csi.cuny.edu (Building 1A, Room 103).

Confidentiality

The privacy of individuals who bring complaints of sexual harassment, who are accused of sexual harassment, or who are otherwise involved in the complaint process should be respected, and information obtained in connection with the filing, investigation, or resolution of complaints should be handled as confidentially as possible. It is not possible, however, to guarantee absolute confidentiality and no such promises should be made by the Sexual Harassment Coordinator, a Deputy Coordinator, Awareness and Intake Committee member or other College employees who may be involved in the complaint process.

Making a Complaint of Sexual Harassment

Any member of the College community may report allegations of sexual harassment to the Sexual Harassment Coordinator, a Deputy Coordinator or any member of the Awareness and Intake Committee. Employees who are covered by collective bargaining agreements may elect to use both their contractual grievance procedures, within the time limits provided in those agreements, to report allegations of sexual harassment; and to report such allegations directly to the Sexual Harassment Coordinator, a Deputy Coordinator or a member of the Sexual Harassment Awareness and Intake Committee. Members of the College community who believe they been aggrieved under the Policy are strongly encouraged to report the allegations of sexual harassment as promptly as possible. Delay in making a complaint may make it more difficult for the college to investigate the allegations.

Sexual Harassment is Illegal

Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.

Members of Sexual Harassment Awareness and Intake Committee

Danielle Dimitrov, Esq. (Coordinator)

Director, Diversity and Compliance, 1A-103
(718) 982-2250

Karen Arca-Contreras
Lecturer, Nursing, 5S-210
(718) 982-3799

Hope Berte
Director, Human Resources, 1A-204
(718) 982-2379

Sondra Brandler, PhD
Associate Professor, Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work (SASW), 4S-234
(718) 982-3769

Christopher Cruz Cullari
Director, Center for Student Accessibility, 1P-101E
(718) 982-2510

Winnie Eng, PhD
Higher Education Officer Associate, Counseling Center, 1A-109E
(718) 982-2738

Calvin Holder, PhD
Professor, History, 2N-210
(718) 982-2880

Darryl Hill, PhD
Associate Professor, Psychology, 4S-112
(718) 982-3758

Fran Mitilieri
Assistant Athletic Director/Business Manager, Sports and Recreation, 1R-204J
(718) 982-3167

Reasonable Accomodations Policy

Overview

The City University of New York and the College of Staten Island (“the College” or “CSI”), in compliance with Sections 503 and 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973 ("Rehabilitation Act"), the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 ("ADA"), New York State Executive Law §296, and New York City Human Rights Law, provides qualified individuals with disabilities the opportunity to participate in programs, activities, or employment.

Please access CSI’s complete Reasonable Accommodations Policy here: www.csi.cuny.edu/diversity_and_compliance/reasonable_accom.html

Procedures for Requesting an Accommodation

Students

A student should make an initial request for accommodation to the Center for Student Accessibility and provide appropriate supporting documentation. The Director of the Center for Student Accessibility may consult with appropriate college officials such as the instructor or provost to determine the appropriateness of the requested accommodation consistent with the program requirements. Such consultation shall be confidential, and limited to those officials whose input is necessary to the decision. Students may consult with the Center for Student Accessibility or the 504/ADA Compliance Coordinator at any time to discuss and understand their rights under the Rehabilitation Act, the ADA, and state and local legislation, and they are encouraged to do so.

The Director of the Center for Student Accessibility, Christopher Cruz Cullari, may be contacted by phone: (718) 982-2510, or email: chris.cruzcullari@csi.cuny.educhris.cruzcullari@csi.cuny.edu (Center for the Arts, Building 1P, Room 101).

The 504/ADA Compliance Coordinator, Danielle Dimitrov, Esq., may be contacted by phone: (718) 982-2250, or email: danielle.dimitrov@csi.cuny.edu (Building 1A, Room 103).

Current Employees

Upon initial hire, each employee is given the opportunity to self-identify as a person with a disability and to request a reasonable accommodation. The self-identification form is to be circulated annually by Human Resources to all current employees to permit the self-identification of employees who may have become disabled subsequent to initial hire.

An employee should make any initial request for accommodation to his/her immediate supervisor. Alternatively, an employee may direct his/her request to the Human Resources Director at the College. In either case, consultation between the employee's supervisor and the Human Resources Director should take place to determine whether the requested accommodation, or an alternate accommodation, is appropriate and should be implemented. Appropriate supporting documentation should be provided to the Human Resources Director. If the proffered accommodation is acceptable to the employee, the Human Resources Director should inform the 504/ADA Compliance Coordinator of the nature of the accommodation.

The Director of the Office of Human Resources, Hope Berté, may be contacted by phone: (718) 982- 2379, or email:hope.berte@csi.cuny.edu (Building 1A, Room 204).

Applicants for Employment

As part of a standard acknowledgment letter, individual applicants are to be instructed to contact the College's Human Resources Director if an accommodation is needed to participate in the application/interview process. The Human Resource Director will make arrangements with the appropriate individuals to provide a reasonable accommodation.

Visitors

Brochures/flyers announcing specific public programs should include a statement identifying the person to contact if an accommodation is needed, and the time frame, by which such a request must be made (e.g., forty-eight hours in advance). A visitor should make a request for accommodation to the designee listed on the flyer. The designee should consult with appropriate college officials to determine the feasibility of granting the requested accommodation. Such consultation shall be confidential, and limited to those officials whose input is necessary to the decision.

Review of Accommodation Requests / Decisions

Students

If a proffered accommodation is unacceptable to a student, the student may discuss the situation with the 504/ADA Compliance Coordinator who will review the matter and attempt to resolve it. If the proffered accommodation is still unacceptable, the College Compliance Coordinator will apprise the College President of the issues and the College Compliance Coordinator's recommendation. The President shall make the final decision.

Current Employees

If an employee does not agree with a proffered accommodation, the employee may discuss the situation with the 504/ADA Compliance Coordinator who will review the matter and attempt to resolve it. If the matter is not resolved, the employee may exercise any and all rights available under law without fear of retaliation. If the employee is a union member, the employee may wish to discuss this situation with his/her union representative and exercise any rights available under the collective bargaining agreement. The Compliance Coordinator will keep the President apprised of the matter.

Applicants for Employment

Applicants whose request for accommodation is denied or who do not agree with a proposed accommodation for the application/interview process will inform the Human Resource Director. The Human Resources Director will inform the 504/ADA Coordinator who will make the final decision and inform the applicant of the decision.

Visitors

If a visitor finds a proffered accommodation unacceptable, the visitor may discuss the situation with the 504/ADA Compliance Coordinator. The Compliance Coordinator shall make the final decision after consultation with the College President.

The City University of New York Workplace Violence Policy and Procedures

The City University of New York has a long-standing commitment to promoting a safe and secure academic and work environment that promotes the achievement of its mission of teaching, research, scholarship and service. All members of the University community–students, faculty and staff–are expected to maintain a working and learning environment free from violence, threats of harassment, violence, intimidation or coercion. While these behaviors are not prevalent at the University, no organization is immune.

The purpose of this policy is to address the issue of potential workplace violence in our community, prevent workplace violence from occurring to the fullest extent possible, and set forth procedures to be followed when such violence has occurred.

Policy

The City University of New York prohibits workplace violence. Violence, threats of violence, intimidation, harassment, coercion, or other threatening behavior towards people or property will not be tolerated. Complaints involving workplace violence will not be ignored and will be given the serious attention they deserve. Individuals who violate this policy may be removed from University property and are subject to disciplinary and/or personnel action up to and including termination, consistent with University policies, rules and collective bargaining agreements, and/or referral to law enforcement authorities for criminal prosecution. Complaints of sexual harassment are covered under the University’s Policy Against Sexual Harassment.

The University, at the request of an employee or student, or at its own discretion, may prohibit members of the public, including family members, from seeing an employee or student on University property unless necessary to transact University-related business. This policy particularly applies in cases where the employee or student suspects that an act of violence will result from an encounter with said individual(s).

Scope

All faculty, staff, students, vendors, contractors, consultants, and others who do business with the University, whether in a University facility or off-campus location where University business is conducted, are covered by this policy. This policy also applies to other persons not affiliated with the University, such as former employees, former students, and visitors. When students have complaints about other students, they should contact the Office of Student Affairs at their campus.

Definitions

  1. Workplace violence is any behavior that is violent, threatens violence, coerces, harasses or intimidates others, interferes with an individual’s legal rights of movement or expression, or disrupts the workplace, the academic environment, or the University’s ability to provide services to the public. Examples of workplace violence include, but are not limited to:
  2. Disruptive behavior intended to disturb, interfere with or prevent normal work activities (such as yelling, using profanity, verbally abusing others, or waving arms and fists).
  3. Intentional physical contact for the purpose of causing harm (such as slapping, stabbing, punching, striking, shoving, or other physical attack).
  4. Menacing or threatening behavior (such as throwing objects, pounding on a desk or door, damaging property, stalking, or otherwise acting aggressively; or making oral or written statements specifically intended to frighten, coerce, or threaten) where a reasonable person would interrupt such behavior as constituting evidence of intent to cause harm to individuals or property.
  5. Possessing firearms, imitation firearms, knives or other dangerous weapons, instruments or materials. No one within the University community, shall have in their possession a firearm or other dangerous weapon, instrument or material that can be used to inflict bodily harm on an individual or damage to University property without specific written authorization from the Chancellor or the college President regardless of whether the individual possesses a valid permit to carry the firearm or weapon.

Reporting of Incidents

1. General Reporting Responsibilities

Incidents of workplace violence, threats of workplace violence, or observations of workplace violence are not be ignored by any member of the University community. Workplace violence should promptly be reported to the appropriate University official (see below). Additionally, faculty, staff and students are encouraged to report behavior that they reasonably believe poses a potential for workplace violence as defined above. It is important that all members of the University community take this responsibility seriously to effectively maintain a safe working and learning environment.

2. Imminent or Actual Violence

Any person experiencing or witnessing imminent danger or actual violence involving weapons or personal injury should call the Campus Public Safety Office immediately, or call 911.

3. Acts of Violence Not Involving Weapons or Injuries to Persons

Any person who is the subject of a suspected violation of this policy involving violence without weapons or personal injury, or is a witness to such suspected violation, should report the incident to his or her supervisor, or in lieu thereof, to their respective Campus Public Safety Office. Students should report such incidents to the Office of Student Affairs at their campus or in lieu thereof, their campus Public Safety Office. The Campus Public Safety Office will work with the Office of Human Resources and the supervisor or the Office of Student Affairs on an appropriate response.

4. Commission of a Crime

All individuals who believe a crime has been committed against them have the right, and are encouraged, to report the incident to the appropriate law enforcement agency.

5. False Reports

Members of the University community who make false and malicious complaints of workplace violence, as opposed to complaints which, even if erroneous, are made in good faith, will be subject to disciplinary action and/or referral to civil authorities as appropriate.

6. Incident Reports

The University will report incidents of workplace violence consistent with the College Policies for Incident Reporting Under the Campus Security Policy and Statistical Act (Cleary Act).

Responsibilities

1. Presidents

The President of each constituent college of The City University of New York, the Chief Operating Officer at the Central Office, and the Deans of the Law School and the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education shall be responsible for the implementation of this policy on his or her respective campus. The responsibility includes dissemination of this policy to all members of the college community, ensuring appropriate investigation and follow-up of all alleged incidents of workplace violence, constituting a Workplace Violence Advisory Team (See #7. below), and ensuring that all administrators, managers, and supervisors are aware of their responsibilities under this policy through internal communications and training.

2. Campus Public Safety Office

The Campus Public Safety Office is responsible for responding to, intervening, and documenting all incidents of violence in the workplace. The Campus Public Safety Office will immediately log all incidents of workplace violence and will notify the respective supervisor of an incident with his/her employee, or notify the appropriate campus official of an incident with a student. All officers should be knowledgeable of when law enforcement action may be appropriate. Public Safety will maintain an internal tracking system of all threats and incidents of violence. Annual reports will be submitted to the President (at the same time as the report noted below) detailing the number and description of workplace violence incidents, the disposition of the incidents, and recommend policy, training issues, or security procedures that were or should be implemented to maintain a safe working and learning environment. These incidents will be reported in the Annual Report of the College Advisory Committee on Campus Security consistent with the reporting requirements of Article 129A Subsection 6450 of the NYS Education Law (Regulation by Colleges of Conduct on Campuses and Other College Property for Educational Purposes).

Officers will be trained in workplace violence awareness and prevention, non-violent crises intervention, conflict management, and dispute resolution.

Officers will work closely with Human Resources when the possibility of workplace violence is heightened, as well as on the appropriate response to workplace violence incidents consistent with CUNY policies, rules, procedures and applicable labor agreements, including appropriate disciplinary action up to and including termination.

When informed, Public Safety will maintain a record of any Orders of Protection for faculty, staff, and students. Public Safety will provide escort service to members of the college community within its geographical confines, when sufficient personnel are available. Such services are to be extended at the discretion of the Campus Public Safety Director or designee. Only the President, or designee, in his/her absence, can authorize escort service outside of the geographical confines of the college.

3. Supervisors

Each dean, director, department chairperson, executive officer, administrator, or other person with supervisory responsibility (hereinafter “supervisor”) is responsible within his/her area of jurisdiction for the implementation of this policy. Supervisors must report to their respective Campus Public Safety Office any complaint of workplace violence made to him/her and any other incidents of workplace violence of which he/she becomes aware or reasonably believes to exist. Supervisors are expected to inform their immediate supervisor promptly about any complaints, acts, or threats of violence even if the situation has been addressed and resolved. After having reported such complaint or incident to the Campus Public Safety Director and immediate supervisor, the supervisor should keep it confidential and not disclose it further, except as necessary during the investigation process and/or subsequent proceedings.

Supervisors are required to contact the Campus Public Safety Office immediately in the event of imminent or actual violence involving weapons or potential physical injuries.

4. Faculty and Staff

Faculty and staff must report workplace violence, as defined above, to their supervisor. Faculty and staff who are advised by a student that a workplace violence incident has occurred or has been observed must report this to the Campus Public Safety Director immediately. Recurring or persistent workplace violence that an employee reasonably believes is not being addressed satisfactorily, or violence that is, or has been, engaged in by the employee’s supervisor should be brought to the attention of the Campus Public Safety Director.

Employees who have obtained Orders of Protection are expected to notify their supervisors and the Campus Public Safety Office of any orders that list CUNY locations as protected areas.

Victims of domestic violence who believe the violence may extend into the workplace, or employees who believe that domestic or other personal matters may result in their being subject to violence extending into the workplace, are encouraged to notify their supervisor, or the Campus Public Safety Office. Confidentiality will be maintained to the extent possible.

Upon hiring, and annually thereafter, faculty and staff will receive copies of this policy. Additionally, the policy will be posted throughout the campus and be placed on the CUNY website and on the college’s website, as appropriate.

5. Office of Human Resources

The Office of Human Resources at each campus is responsible for assisting the Campus Public Safety Director and supervisors in responding to workplace violence; facilitating appropriate responses to reported incidents of workplace violence; notifying the Campus Public Safety Office of workplace violence incidents reported to that office; and consulting with, as necessary, counseling services to secure professional intervention.

The Office of Human Resources is responsible for providing new employees or employees transferred to the campus with a copy of the Workplace Violence Policy and Procedures and insuring that faculty and staff receive appropriate training. The Office of Human Resources will also be responsible for annually disseminating this policy to all faculty and staff at their campus, as well as posting the policy throughout the campus and on the college’s website, as appropriate.

6. Students

Students who witness violence, learn of threats, or are victims of violence by employees, students or others should report the incident immediately to the Campus Public Safety Office. If there is no imminent danger, students should report threatening incidents by employees, students or others as soon as possible to the Campus Public Safety Office or Office of Student Affairs. Students will be provided with workplace violence awareness information (including information regarding available counseling services) upon registration each year.

7. Workplace Violence Advisory Team

A college President shall establish a Workplace Violence Advisory Team at his/her college. This Team, working with the College Advisory Committee on Campus Security, will assist the President in responding to workplace violence; facilitating appropriate responses to reported incidents of workplace violence; assessing the potential problem of workplace violence at its site; assessing the college’s readiness for dealing with workplace violence; evaluating incidents to prevent future occurrences; and utilizing prevention, intervention, and interviewing techniques in responding to workplace violence. This Team will also develop workplace violence prevention tools (such as pamphlets, guidelines and handbooks) to further assist in recognizing and preventing workplace violence on campus. It is recommended that this Team include representatives from Campus Public Safety, Human Resources, Labor Relations, Counseling Services, Occupational Health and Safety, Legal, and others, including faculty, staff and students, as deemed appropriate by the President.

In lieu of establishing the Workplace Violence Advisory Team, a President may opt to expand the College Advisory Committee on Campus Security with representatives from the areas recommended above to address workplace violence issues at the campus and perform the functions outlined above.

8. University Communications

All communications to the University community and outside entities regarding incidents of workplace violence will be made through the University Office of University Relations after consultation with the respective President or his/her designee.

Education

Colleges are responsible for the dissemination and enforcement of this policy as described herein, as well as for providing opportunities for training in the prevention and awareness of workplace violence. The Office of Faculty and Staff Relations will provide assistance to the campuses in identifying available training opportunities, as well as other resources and tools, (such as reference materials detailing workplace violence warning signs) that can be incorporated into campus prevention materials for dissemination to the college community. Additionally, the Office of Faculty and Staff Relations will offer periodic training opportunities to supplement the college’s training programs.

Confidentiality

The University shall maintain the confidentiality of investigations of workplace violence to the extent possible. The University will act on the basis of anonymous complaints where it has a reasonable basis to believe that there has been a violation of this policy and that the safety and well being of members of the University community would be served by such action.

Retaliation

Retaliation against anyone acting in good faith who has made a complaint of workplace violence, who has reported witnessing workplace violence, or who has been involved in reporting, investigating, or responding to workplace violence is a violation of this policy. Those found responsible for retaliatory action will be subject to discipline up to and including termination.

Approved by the Board of Trustees

June 28, 2004

Last Updated: 7/13/04

Tobacco Policy

The College complies with The City University policy prohibiting the use of tobacco on all grounds and facilities under CUNY jurisdiction, including indoor locations and parking lotsd outdoor locations such as playing fields; entrances and exits to buildings; and smoking, which prohibits smoking inside all facilities of the College; tobacco industry promotions, advertising, markieting, and distribution of marketing materials on campus properties; and tobacco industry sponsorship of athletic events and athletes. For more information on the CUNY Tobacco Policy please visit http://policy.cuny.edu/pdf_source/btm/2011/01-24.pdf#page=10.

Catalog Contents

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Graduate Catalog 2014-2015

Message from the President

About the College

Admissions

Registrar

Tuition and Fees

Financial Aid

Academic Policies and Procedures

Academic Services/Student Services

Graduate Degrees and Certificate Programs

CUNY Doctoral Degree Programs

Graduate Programs, Disciplines, and Course Offerings

Master of Science in Accounting (MS)

Autism Spectrum Disorders Advanced Certificate

Master of Science in Biology (MS)

Master of Science in Business Management (MS)

Master of Arts in Cinema and Media Studies (MA)

Master of Science in Computer Science (MS)

Graduate Programs in Education

Master of Arts in English (MA)

Master of Science in Environmental Science (MS)

Master of Arts in History (MA)

Master of Arts in Liberal Studies (MA)

Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (MA)

Master of Science in Neuroscience, Mental Retardation, and Developmental Disabilities (MS)

Graduate Programs in Nursing

Master of Science in Adult - Gerontological Nursing (MS)

Advanced Certificate Programs

Nursing Courses

Doctorate in Physical Therapy (DPT)

Program Overview

Accreditation Status

Program Goals

Graduation, Enrollment, Licensure Pass Rates

Doctorate in Physical Therapy (DPT) Admission, Application, Progression and Retention Requirements

Doctorate in Physical Therapy (DPT) Degree Requirements

Clinical Affiliations

Program FAQS

Physical Therapy Courses

PHT 70100 Clinical Anatomy

PHT 70200 Medical Terminology

PHT 70300 Foundations of Patient Care

PHT 70400 Introduction to Physical Therapy Practice & Ethics

PHT 70500 Upper Extremity Kinesiology & Assessment

PHT 70600 Psychosocial Aspects of Clinical Practice

PHT 71000 Research Design

PHT 72000 Human Physiology and Exercise Physiology

PHT 73000 Structure and Function of the Nervous System

PHT 74000 PT Interventions and Preventions

PHT 75000 Physical Modalities - Clinical Decision Making and Application

PHT 76000 Lower Extremity Kinesiology & Assessment

PHT 77000 Directed Research I

PHT 78000 Clinical Medicine for PT

PHT 79500 Integumentary System: Assessment & Intervention

PHT 80000 Introduction to Musculoskeletal Examination

PHT 80100 Pulmonary Evaluation and Interventions

PHT 80200 Clinical Education: Education Theories

PHT 80300 Differential Diagnosis & Intervention in Clinical Orthopedics

PHT 80400 Introduction to Neurological PT

PHT 80500 Musculoskeletal Examination I

PHT 80600 Clinical Affiliation I

PHT 80700 Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation

PHT 80800 Differential Diagnosis in Neurological Evaluation

PHT 80900 Directed Research II

PHT 81000 Neurological Interventions I

PHT 81100 Cardiac Rehabilitation

PHT 82000 Clinical Orthopedics II/Radiology and Imaging

PHT 83000 Orthotics & Prosthetics

PHT 84000 Differential Diagnosis & Intervention in Clinical Neurology

PHT 85000 Musculoskeletal Examination II

PHT 86000 Directed Research III

PHT 87000 Health Promotion through the Life Span

PHT 87200 Topics in PT

PHT 88000 Neurological Interventions II

PHT 88100 Seminar on Organization and Management

PHT 88200 Pediatric Development and Assessment

PHT 88300 Pharmacology and Systems Review

PHT 88400 Musculoskeletal Examination III

PHT 88500 Electroneuromyography and Motion Analysis

PHT 88600 Clinical Affiliation II

PHT 88700 Clinical Decision Making

PHT 88800 Directed Research IV

PHT 88950 Clinical Affiliation III

PHT 89000 Clinical Affiliation IV

PHT 90000 Directed Research V

Doctorate in Physical Therapy (DPT)

Master of Social Work (MSW)

Master of Social Work (MSW) Mission and Goals

Master of Social Work (MSW) Admission Requirements

Master of Social Work (MSW) Dismissal, Probation, Continuation and Graduation

Master of Social Work (MSW) Degree Requirements

Social Work Courses

Topics Courses and Independent Study

Graduate Courses in Selected Disciplines

American Studies Courses

Art Courses

Biology Courses

Computer Science Courses

Dramatic Arts Courses

Environmental Science Courses

Geography Courses

History Courses

Mathematics Courses

Political Science Courses

Science Courses

Appendix

Travel Information

Index