College of Staten Island
 The City University of New York
 
  
    
  Ellen-ge Denton
Assistant Professor
Psychology

Ellen-ge Denton
Assistant Professor

Office : Building 4S Room 229
Phone : 718.982.3803
Fax : 718.982.4114
ellenge.denton@csi.cuny.edu


Degrees :
PsyD, St. Johnís University
MS, Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health




Biography / Academic Interests :
Dr. Dentonís primary research interest is to identify prevention factors associated with suicide-depression, cross-culturally, and to develop, test, and disseminate primary and secondary interventions to improve adolescent mental health outcomes in low and middle income countries (LMICs) or resource poor areas in the US. Dr. Denton is a licensed psychologist with postdoctoral training in pediatric psychiatry and clinical research methods, and experience providing psychological consultation services to youth organizations.

Scholarship / Publications :
1. Denton E, Shaffer J, Alcantara C, Cadermil, E. Neighborhood matters: The impact of Hispanic ethnic density on future depressive symptoms 1-year following an ACS event among Hispanic patients. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 2016, 39, 1, 28-40.
2. Denton E, Shaffer J, Alcantara C, Clemow L, & Brondolo E. Hispanic residential ethnic density and depression in post-ACS patients: Re-thinking the role of social support. International Journal of Social Psychiatry. 2014, 60:4, 1-11. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4281507.
3. Denton E, Green P, Newman J, Siqin Ye, Davidson KW, & Schwartz, J. The benefits of neighborhood racial diversity: neighborhood factors and its association with increased physical activity in ACS patients. International Journal of Cardiology, 2014, 173, 517-518. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4031237.
4. Denton E, Chaplin WF, Wall M. Methodological Design and Psychometric Analysis to assess Teacher Burnout. International Journal of Quantitative Research in Education, 2013, 147-166.
5. Denton E, Rieckmann N, Davidson KW, Chaplin WF. Psychosocial Vulnerabilities to Depression after Acute Coronary Syndrome: The Pivotal Role of Rumination in Predicting and Maintaining Depression. Front Psychol. 2012; 3:288. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3417406

Last Updated: 09.20.2016