College of Staten Island
 The City University of New York
 
  
Team

   Hildegard Hoeller,
   WAC/WID coordinator
   Office: Building 2S Rm 130
   Phone: 718.982.4138
   Fax: 718.982.3643

   Email WAC/WID


Writing Across the Curriculum/
Writing in the Disciplines

 Meet the Team 2011-2012

Hildegard Hoeller, coordinator.

Hildegard Hoeller, coordinator.

Hildegard Hoeller is Professor of English with an appointment in English and Women’s Studies at the Graduate Center. Her academic and teaching interests are 19th and 20th Century American literature, with an emphasis on women writers and African-American writers. She specializes in fiction, and she is particularly interested in the sentimental tradition and in the connections between fiction and economic thinking. She is the acting coordinator for the WAC/WID program at the College of Staten Island.


Andrew Brooks, writing fellow.

Andrew Brooks, writing fellow.

Andrew Brooks is a Doctoral Student in Cultural Anthropology at the Graduate Center. His dissertation work focuses on cultural and environmental impacts of the burgeoning natural gas industry in Pennsylvania. As a Writing Fellow at the CSI, Brooks is working with Fellow Heather Katz, Science, Letters & Society (SLS) and the Department of Education to further implement writing-focused assignments and exercises into the curriculum stream.

 

 


Albert Fayngold, writing fellow.

Albert Fayngold, writing fellow. 

Albert Fayngold is a Ph. D. candidate in comparative literature at the Graduate Center of CUNY. Fayngold was born in Kiev, Ukraine, where he studied painting and architecture at the City School of Fine Arts and the National Academy of Art. He holds a B.A. in English and an M.A. in Literary Studies. His doctoral dissertation, Superfluous Selves: Poetics of Renunciation in Ivan Turgenev and Henry James, focuses on the two major 19th century authors whose literary and personal associations as self-exiles in France yields evidence of deep-seated connections between their writings and their radically uprooted lives. As a Writing Fellow at CSI, he is working with Prof. Alan Zimmerman of the CSI Business Department on monitoring writing-related tasks in-class as well as designing a comprehensive teaching plan that will serve as a template for the Business Department’s implementation of WAC initiatives.


Heather Katz, writing fellow.

Heather Katz, writing fellow. 

Heather Katz is a PhD student in the CUNY Graduate Center’s Political Science program. For the past three years she has taught courses in introductory political science, international politics, and political theory at Queens College. Her dissertation centers on the relationship between human rights and information technology. Along with Andrew Brooks and the SLS (Science, Letters, and Society) program of CSI, her year will be dedicated to enriching student writing of those pursuing certification in early childhood and childhood education. In particular, this will deal with identifying some of the major writing difficulties these students possess, researching these problem areas, and instituting a long-term research project that will analyze the effects of WAC’s intervention in the curriculum and the students chosen for analysis.


Amalia Paladino, writing fellow.

Amalia Paladino, writing fellow.

Amalia Paladino is a Ph.D. candidate in Criminal Justice at the Graduate Center. She is working as a Writing Fellow at CUNY CSI with Dr. Patricia Brooks in the Psychology Department, providing assistance in two advanced writing-intensive courses, both involving students in the process of conducting and evaluating scientific research. In particular, she is helping structure the Macaulay Honors Research Seminar which will enhance the interdisciplinary oral and written communication skills and confidence among students with a firm grasp on ethical considerations. Amalia’s research interests include violent victimization- -particularly against vulnerable populations including sex workers, drug users, and undocumented persons -- and the commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC). In recent years she has conducted ethnographic field work recruiting and working with these hard-to-reach populations in New York and New Jersey. She is currently writing her dissertation on young adults’ experiences in sex work in New York City and Atlantic City.


Estefania Ponti, writing fellow.

Estefania Ponti, writing fellow.

Estefania Ponti is a cultural anthropology doctoral student at the Graduate Center. Estefania’s doctoral research focuses on the ways in which US women veterans understand and experience “women veteran identity” in opposition to and in accommodation to the hegemonic construction of said identity. As a writing fellow at CSI, she is working with Professor Jegerski to develop a project on heritage speakers of Spanish. Traditionally, all materials and curricula for Spanish language teaching in the US are based on the principles of foreign language teaching. Yet, an increasing number of CSI students are native bilingual speakers of Spanish who were raised in Spanish‐speaking homes. Thus, the majority of existing materials available for our Spanish courses are not suited to meet the needs of these heritage speakers of Spanish. With Professor Jegerski, Estefania will develop new teaching materials for Spanish Heritage students.


Laura Teresa Di Summa, writing fellow.

Laura Teresa Di Summa, writing fellow. 

Laura Teresa Di Summa is a Ph.D candidate in philosophy at the Graduate Center, and an adjunct instructor at Baruch college. Her areas of research are philosophy of art and cognitive science, with a specific interest in philosophy of literature and philosophy of film. She is currently writing her dissertation on a narrative theory of autobiographical expression in literature and film.