Open menu button Close menu button

Course Offerings and Descriptions

FALL 2022 ENGLISH MAJOR COURSE OFFERINGS                                                         

ENL 267           Craft of Creative Writing                                           Prof. C. Marvin

WRITING         ONLINE SYNC, MW 2:30 – 4:25

ENL 267           Craft of Creative Writing                                           Prof. T. Jess

WRITING         PERSON, Wednesday, 6:30 – 9:50

 

ENL 277           Introduction to Journalism                                       Prof. F. Kaufman

WRITING         PERSON, T/F 12:20 – 2:15

ENL 290           Introduction to Literary Studies                               Prof. A. Bardsley

REQUIRED       PERSON T/TH, 10:00 – 12:05

 

ENL 290           Introduction to Literary Studies                               TBA

REQUIRED       TBA

 

ENL 300           British and American Literary Traditions                 Prof. S. Greeley

REQUIRED       PERSON, Friday, 10:10 – 2:15

 

ENL 300           British and American Literary Traditions                 Prof. M. Feola

REQUIRED       PERSON, Saturday, 10:10-2:15

 

ENL 310           World Literature in Contexts                                    Prof. S. Greeley

REQUIRED       PERSON, T/Th, 4:40-6:20

 

ENL 310           World Literature in Contexts                                    Prof. S. Ray

REQUIRED       PERSON, Monday, 6:30 – 9:50          

           

ENL 320           17TH Century English Literature                                Prof M. Feola

LITERATURE    ONLINE SYNC, T/TH 12:20 – 2:15

 

ENL 323           Coming of Age Narratives                                         Prof. H. Thorne

LITERATURE    PERSON, T/Th, 10:10-12:05

 

ENL 325           Readings in Victorian Literature                               Prof. S. Reader

LITERATURE    PERSON, M/W, 12:20-2:05

 

ENL 327           20th Century American Poetry                                  Prof. T. Gray

LITERATURE    PERSON, M/W, 2:30 -4:25

 

ENL 335           Modern East Asian Literature                                   Prof. J Dudley

LITERATURE    HYBRID, Thursday, 12:20 – 2:15

 

ENL 339           The Tragic Vision                                                        Prof. S. Reader

LITERATURE    PERSON, M/W 10:10 – 12:05

 

ENL 356           American Drama                                                        Prof. L. Papa

LITERATURE    PERSON, M/W 10:10 – 12:05

 

ENL 362           The Later Shakespeare                                              Prof. S. Reader

LITERATURE    PERSON, Wednesday, 6:30 – 9:50

 

ENL 372           Craft of Poetry                                                           Prof. C. Marvin

WRITING         ONLINE SYNC, Wednesday, 6:30 - 9:50

 

ENL 373           Craft of Playwriting                                                   Prof. L. Papa

WRITING         PERSON, M/W 12:20 – 2:15

 

ENL 390           Studies in Women’s Literature and the Arts            Prof. D. Kandiyoti

LITERATURE    ONLINE SYNC, Thursday, 6:30 - 9:50

 

ENL 392           Literature of the African Diaspora                            Prof. M. Bellamy

LITERATURE    HYBRID, Wednesday, 2:30m – 4:25

 

ENL 396           Postcolonial Literature                                              Prof. A. Dawson

LITERATURE    HYBRID, Tuesday, 6:30m – 9:50

 

ENL 431           Fiction Workshop                                                      Prof. S. Schulman

WRITING         PERSON, Friday, 6:30 – 9:50 (St. George)

 

ENL 434           Creative Nonfiction Workshop                                 Prof. A. Chin

WRITING         ONLINE SYNC, M/W, 4:40 – 6:20

 

ENL 440           Magazine Writing                                                      Prof. A. Chin

WRITING         ONLINE SYNC, Monday, 6:30 – 9:50

SATISYING YOUR REQUIREMENTS! AN OVERVIEW.

THE LITERATURE CONCENTRATION: Coverage Areas

In order to fulfill the Literature Concentration requirements in the English major, you must  complete classes in the following five coverage areas (plus three electives!):

  1. British literature
  2. American literature
  3. Literature in translation
  4. Literature written by women, American minorities, or writers in Asia (including the Middle East), Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean
  5. Genre / Theme

Our Fall 2022 Literature Courses Satisfy the Following Coverage Areas:

  • English/British Literature: ENL 325, ENL 362
  • American Literature: ENL 323 (this semester only), ENL 327, ENL 356
  • Literature in Translation: ENL 338, ENL 335, ENL 390, ENKL 396
  • Lit by women, American Minorities, or writers in Asia (including the Middle East), Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean: ENL 323, ENL 327, ENL 335, ENL 390, ENL 392, ENL 396
  • Genre and Theme: ENL 323, ENL 327, ENL 335, ENL 339, ENL 356, ENL 362
  • Pre-1800 Courses: ENL 320, ENL 339, ENL 362

THE WRITING CONCENTRATION: Coverage Areas

In order to fulfill the Writing Concentration requirements in the English major, you need to take:

  • ENL 267 Craft of Creative Writing
  • Four Writing courses at the 300/400 level

Our Fall 2022 Writing Courses:

  • ENL 267, 277, 372, 373, 431, 434, 449

DRAMATIC LITERATURE CONCENTRATION: Coverage Areas

Our Fall 2022 Dramatic Literature Courses:

  • ENL 356, ENL 362

LINGUISTICS CONCENTRATION COURSES:

ENL 201, 301, 302, 304, 350, 405, 410, 412, 420

ENL 267         CRAFT OF CREATIVE WRITING                                         MARVIN

WRITING       ONLINE SYNC, MW 2:30 – 4:25

Craft of Creative Writing introduces students to the literary conventions of creative nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and playwriting. The course will explore the elements that set the genres apart, the elements they share, and the relationship between reading and writing. Texts will be taken from the four major genres and used as models for students’ creative writing. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a forum in which to present their own creative work and discuss the creative work of both classmates and published authors. This semester, our primary concerns as writers will be:

  • To acquire the terminology with which one discusses aspects of craft in creative writing.
  • To explore the distinctions that set apart genres.
  • To produce a substantial body of work in all four genres.
  • To locate where the boundaries that distinguish genres are blurred

*This is a PREREQUISITE for all 300/400 Writing Courses.

 

ENL 267         CRAFT OF CREATIVE WRITING                                        JESS

WRITING       PERSON, Tuesday, 6:30 – 9:50

Craft of Creative Writing introduces students to the literary conventions of creative nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and playwriting. The course will explore the elements that set the genres apart, the elements they share, and the relationship between reading and writing. Texts will be taken from the four major genres and used as models for students' creative writing. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

*This is a PREREQUISITE for all 300/400 Writing Courses.

 

ENL 277         INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM                                    KAUFMAN

WRITING       PERSON, T/F 12:20 – 2:15

Introduction to Journalism will present students will the concept of newsworthiness while emphasizing the basic elements of journalistic writing and media analysis, including hard news, soft news, objective reporting, working with sources, profiles, spot event coverage, opinion writing, and photojournalism. Special emphasis will be placed on the language, vocabulary, and structural requirements of successful heds, deks, and ledes. Throughout the semester we will focus on newsroom issues such as the manifold legal and ethical issues that surround reportage.

 

ENL 290         INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF LITERATURE          BARDSLEY

REQUIRED    PERSON T/TH, 10:00 – 12:05

An introduction to the study of literature and specifically to the ways that people think, talk, and write about literature.  We will address the basic questions of literary study and its vocabulary: What is literature?  What are the main kinds of literature?  What are the main approaches to the study of literature?  Students will read a selection of works that represent a variety of periods and movements; and through frequent informal writing assignments, two short essays, and an annotated bibliography assignment, learn to apply formal terms crucial for further study in the field. 

*This is both a requirement and a pre and/or corequisite for ENL 300 and ENL 310.

 

ENL 290         INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF LITERATURE          STAFF

REQUIRED       PERSON Friday, 6:30 – 9:50

An introduction to the study of literature and specifically to the ways that people think, talk, and write about literature.  We will address the basic questions of literary study and its vocabulary: What is literature?  What are the main kinds of literature?  What are the main approaches to the study of literature?  Students will read a selection of works that represent a variety of periods and movements; and through frequent informal writing assignments, two short essays, and an annotated bibliography assignment, learn to apply formal terms crucial for further study in the field. 

*This is both a requirement and a pre and/or corequisite for ENL 300 and ENL 310.

 

ENL 300         BRITISH AND AMERICAN LITERARY TRADITIONS           GREELEY

REQUIRED       PERSON, Friday, 10:10 – 2:15

A one-semester survey of British and American literature from the Medieval through the Romantic periods. It will include important works from many genres and modes, placing those works in their aesthetic and cultural contexts.

*Pre- or corequisite: ENL 290.

 

ENL 300         BRITISH AND AMERICAN LITERARY TRADITIONS       FEOLA

REQUIRED       PERSON, Saturday, 10:10-2:15

ENL 300 is a one-semester survey of British and American literature from Medieval through the Romantic periods. During the Fall 2022, we will study important literature from many genres and modes, placing those works in their aesthetic and cultural contexts. We also will examine some criticism that demonstrates various readings, questions, and literary perspectives. 

*Pre- or corequisite: ENL 290.

 

ENL 310         WORLD LITERATURE IN CONTEXTS                    GREELEY

REQUIRED       PERSON, T/Th, 4:40-6:20

An exploration of the literatures of several cultures amid specific historical contexts, as well as a study of cultural differences and similarities and cross-cultural influences. This course examines the literature of polities in at least three disparate geographical regions, during at least two historical periods. It engages students in a practice of literary criticism that sets the texts within particular historical formations, even as students pursue cross-cultural study.  In this course, we will be surveying folklore and wonder tales from several major world civilizations with an eye toward origins of indigenous beliefs, the role of magic and enchantment in pre-modern cultures, and parallels between seemingly disparate peoples.

*Pre- or corequisite: ENL 290.

 

ENL 310         WORLD LITERATURE IN CONTEXTS                                    RAY

REQUIRED       PERSON, Monday, 6:30 – 9:50

An exploration of the literatures of several cultures amid specific historical contexts, as well as a study of cultural differences and similarities and cross-cultural influences. This course examines the literature of polities in at least three disparate geographical regions, during at least two historical periods. It engages students in a practice of literary criticism that sets the texts within particular historical formations, even as students pursue cross-cultural study.

*Pre- or corequisite: ENL 290.

           

ENL 320         17TH CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE                           FEOLA

LITERATURE    ONLINE SYNC, T/TH 12:20 – 2:15

In ENL 320 we will focus on how various authors imagined gender, passion, power, change, and politics [often simultaneously].  We will approach this dynamic century of revolution by dividing it into its three historical and literary periods: the early seventeenth century, the civil wars and Interregnum, and the Restoration. The syllabus will include works by Queen Elizabeth I, William Shakespeare, John Donne, Ben Jonson, John Milton, Mary Astell, and Aphra Behn.

Literature Concentration Coverage Area(s): British, Pre-1800

 

ENL 323         Coming of Age Narratives                                     Prof. H. Thorne

LITERATURE    PERSON, T/Th, 10:10-12:05

In this section of ENL 323, we will read, discuss, and write about the theme of activism within contemporary young adult (YA) literature. Through engaging with novels such as Angie Thomas’s The Hate U Give and Corey Doctorow’s Little Brother, we will think about the relationship between coming-of-age and the development of social and political awareness. In doing so, we will explore how YA writers navigate between the personal struggles of their young protagonists and wider struggles against racism and other forms of oppression. We will also think more broadly about the role of YA novels within US culture and education, and we will discuss how high school teachers can frame the social and political issues raised by the novels. Finally, in keeping with our look at the themes of agency and activism, this class will be partly student-led, and we collectively design the course’s assignment prompts and part of the reading schedule. 

Literature Concentration Coverage Area(s): American, Genre/Theme,

Literature Written by Women/American Minorities, Etc.

 

ENL 325         READINGS IN VICTORIAN LITERATURE                         READER

LITERATURE    PERSON, M/W, 12:20-2:15

“Victorian Disney”

This class presents the literature of the nineteenth century and one of its important afterlives—the art of Walt Disney. Many of Disney’s most famous films are adaptations of nineteenth-century fiction, among them Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book, Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, and numerous folk tales of the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Anderson. We will consider the relationship between originals and adaptations. We will also examine Disney’s uptake of Victorian concerns, such as the role that fantasy plays in a culture increasingly defined by realism, the idea of childhood as a “magical” time of life, and the potential of mass cultural production.

Longstanding debates surrounding Disney’s productions, labor practices, and ethics echo those we find in studies of the Victorian empire. In the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries, The Walt Disney Company has become a multinational corporation that exerts incalculable influence on children and adults across the world. It has been controversial, attracting critiques for its depictions of girlhood, its idealized representation of conflict, and its use of indigenous characters. We will track these controversies to their roots in nineteenth-century politics and aesthetics. 

Literature Concentration Coverage Area(s): British

ENL 327         20TH CENTURY AMERICAN POETRY                                GRAY

LITERATURE    PERSON, T/Th, 4:40 – 6:20

“Five Poets”

In this course we will examine a complementary array of poems written in the United States from 1920-2010. The five featured poets might not enjoy the name recognition granted some of their peers, but they were highly respected within their respective literary communities, and each has earned solid standing in the current curricula of our literature. This semester, we will read, in chronological sequence, the work of Jean Toomer, Muriel Rukeyser, James Wright, Diane Di Prima, and Lucille Clifton. We will engage a range of modes and styles, including prose poems, documentary poems, devotional poems, and “deep image” poems. Contextual considerations will include Black identity and desire, the rights of laborers, environmental justice, Buddhist spirituality, and the reimagining of family structures, among other issues. Informal and subjective writing assignments, such as weekly journals and creative exercises, will substitute for formal essays, to some degree.

Literature Concentration Coverage Area(s): American, Genre/Theme, Literature Written by Women/American Minorities, Etc.

 

ENL 335         MODERN EAST ASIAN LITERATURE                                DUDLEY

SELF AND SOCIETY IN CONTEMPORARY CHINA, SOUTH KOREA AND JAPAN

LITERATURE    HYBRID, Thursday, 12:20 – 2:15

In this course, we read novels from periods of transitions in China and Japan in the 20th and 21st centuries. All these novels describe protagonists who are not entirely at ease in their society and have complicated relationships with, sometimes even hostile, to their communities. Through these works, we examine how major historical and social flux and changes affect human relationships and determine our different modes of being; we analyze how individuals make sense of their worlds and how they survive them; we ask how these narratives reflect our society and how they illuminate our own experiences today.

Literature Concentration Coverage Area(s): Literature Written by Women/American Minorities, Etc., Literature in Translation

 

ENL 339         THE TRAGIC VISION                                                            STAFF

LITERATURE    PERSON, M/W 10:10 – 12:05

Themes and images evident in the Western tragic tradition, in all literary genres, will be examined. Relevant criticism will be studied to develop a framework for evaluation. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and genre course. 

Literature Concentration Coverage Area(s): Genre/Theme, Pre-1800

 

ENL 356         AMERICAN DRAMA                                                             PAPA

LITERATURE    PERSON, M/W 10:10 – 12:05

This course will serve as an in-depth look at the political in 20th- and 21st-century American drama.  We will investigate the performance and historical backgrounds that influence the texts, and we will seek to demonstrate the validity of older plays to contemporary audiences, as well as use drama to confront various subjects. We’ll read writers from Tennessee Williams to Lynn Nottage, looking at a range of works from historical dramas to wild comedies.

Literature Concentration Coverage Area(s): American, Genre/Theme

 

ENL 362         THE LATER SHAKESPEARE                                                READER

LITERATURE    PERSON, Wednesday, 6:30 – 9:50

Shakespeare’s early plays were nearly all extremely successful comedies and histories. His later plays developed the art of tragedy and the experimental genre of romance, a form that often blends elements of comedy, tragedy, and history. This course will consider some of the major and minor works in these genres from the late period, situating them in the context of the early seventeenth century. We will consider the performance conditions of the plays—the kinds of playhouses that prevailed in the day, along with correspondent acting styles and stagecraft. The last plays in Shakespeare’s body of work (such as Pericles) also present an opportunity to consider the question of collaboration and multiple authorship, since those works show the traces of other poets. Throughout the course we will look closely at the performance histories of these plays, considering how directors, actors, designers, and audiences from different periods have transformed and contributed to our understanding of the work.

Literature Concentration Coverage Area(s): British, Genre/Theme, Pre-1800

 

ENL 372         CRAFT OF POETRY                                                  MARVIN

WRITING         ONLINE SYNC, Wednesday, 6:30 - 9:50

This intermediate level poetry workshop has as its focus specific elements of craft:  we will make a brief foray into traditional forms, try our hands at varying modes of lineation, and invent dynamic ways to enter into our poems. If this sounds daunting to you, please be assured it’s all perfectly do-able and quite a bit of fun. We’ll have as our thematic focus what is referred to as Poetry of Witness—that is, works that speaks to civil and human rights. It is the domain of poetry to speak for those who cannot. It is poetry that gives utterance to the unspeakable. And we are living in an age when poetry is utterly necessarily for our sanity and survival. Be warned: we do lots of reading in this class and will write a poem every week.

 

ENL 373         CRAFT OF PLAYWRITING                                                  PAPA

WRITING         PERSON, M/W 12:20 – 2:15

This class will serve as both an introduction to the writing of dramatic scripts, as well as a place to develop short plays.  We will approach plays as a performed medium, and we will build our skills with various exercises and readings.  The class will be writing intensive, both in class and out.  Playwriting, like other genres, has its own demands, and we will explore how writers can use the space of the stage and the word on the page to create compelling drama.

 

ENL 390         STUDIES IN WOMEN’S LITERATURE AND THE ARTS   KANDIYOTI

LITERATURE    ONLINE SYNC, Thursday, 6:30 - 9:50

This course examines women’s literature, art, and film as shaped by national culture, historical circumstances, class, and age.  For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, Literature in Translation, Genre, and Literature written by women, American minorities, or writers in Asia (including the Middle East), Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean.

Literature Concentration Coverage Area(s): Literature in Translation, Literature Written by Women/American Minorities, Etc.,

ENL 392         LITERATURE OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA                                BELLAMY

LITERATURE    HYBRID, Wednesday, 2:30 – 4:25

This course will focus on the fictional and non-fictional work of Edwidge Danticat and Caryl Phillips, writers whose work examines the meaning and consequences of Diaspora in numerous thought-provoking and innovative ways. Danticat’s writings focus on the experiences of Haitians living both in their homeland and beyond in Diaspora. Phillips’ writings explore the individual and collective, historic and contemporary effects of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, the origin of the African Diaspora. Texts under consideration for this course include Danticat’s The Dew Breaker and Create Dangerously and Phillips’ Crossing the River and The Atlantic Sound.  

This course will be hybrid with weekly in-person meetings. Students will complete weekly online assignments, as well as two formal essays, one group presentation, reading quizzes and other informal group activities.

Literature Concentration Coverage Area(s): Literature Written by Women/American Minorities, Etc.

 

ENL 396         POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE                                          PROF. A. DAWSON

LITERATURE    HYBRID, Tuesday, 6:30 – 9:50

An examination of literature and critical theory that responds to the historical fact of colonization across the world. Issues and themes to be considered include literary representations of struggles in postcolonial nations for environmental and climate justice, for alternative models of development, for rights for Indigenous People and land-dependent communities, and for land back.

Literature Concentration Coverage Area(s): Literature in Translation,

Literature Written by Women/American Minorities, Etc.

 

ENL 431         FICTION WORKSHOP                                                          SCHULMAN

WRITING         PERSON, Friday, 6:30 – 9:50 (St. George)

An advanced workshop, ENL 431 makes students conscious of the choices involved in fiction writing.  Narrative arc, character voice, activating scenes, animating dialogue, are all explained and enacted. Students are encouraged to grapple with things that matter. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course. Pre- or corequisite: ENL 267  

This Semester’s Theme: IMAGINING THE WORLD YOU KNOW

Our focus this semester will be imagining stories using places, characters, and themes that we live with everyday. 

No derivative writing: That means no speculative fiction/science fiction using characters, tropes, or settings from pre-existing fantasy/manga/television/worlds.

 

ENL 434         CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP                              CHIN

WRITING         ONLINE SYNC, Monday, 6:30 – 9:50

In this creative writing workshop, we will focus on closely on memoir writing. We will discuss: fracture; self-portraits and family portraits; the role of memory and perception; the relation of the individual to society; the structure and ethics of “truth” in nonfiction. We will study how writers use literary devices such as point of view, “scenes” vs. “summarizing,” and attention to character, setting, and detail to craft their stories. There will be in-class and take home writing assignments. Be prepared to write!

 

ENL 440         MAGAZINE WRITING                                                          CHIN

WRITING         ONLINE SYNC, Monday, 6:30 – 9:50

In this writing course, we will address current issues and trends in magazine journalism, including ethics, digital media, and the changing face of the genre in the wake of new technology. We will read articles from the NY Times MagazineLA Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, SlateVIBE, and other publications. In addition to written assignments, and a draft, students are expected to turn in a reported feature-length story on a relevant subject of their choosing, pending approval from the professor. We will look at investigative journalism, narrative journalism, feature stories, food writing, and gonzo journalism, among others.

 

LITERATURE
 

  • ENL 305 Critical Approaches to Children’s and Young Adult Literature (eve)
  • ENL 318 English Literature of the Renaissance (day)
  • ENL 321 South Asian Literature (day)
  • ENL 345 American Fiction Since WW II (day)
  • ENL 352 Major Twentieth-Century Poets
  • ENL 358 World Drama (day)
  • ENL 361 The Early Shakespeare (day)
  • ENL 368 Queer Studies (eve)
  • ENL 377 The African American Literary Tradition  
  • ENL 379 Major English Author II (day)
  • ENL 381 Major American Author I (eve)
  • ENL 397 Global Literature (eve)

WRITING

  • ENL 267 Craft of Creative Writing (day) prerequisite
  • ENL 267 Craft of Creative Writing (eve) prerequisite
  • ENL 277 Journalism (eve)
  • ENL 370 Craft of Creative Nonfiction (day)
  • ENL 371 Craft of Fiction (day)
  • ENL 430 Creative Writing (day)
  • ENL 432 Poetry workshop (day)
  • ENL 435 Playwriting Workshop (eve)

LINGUISTICS

  • LING 101 Linguistic Diversity
  • LING 201 Introduction to Language
  • LING 201 Introduction to Language
  • LING 301 Introduction to Linguistics
  • LING 301 Introduction to Linguistics
  • LING 302 Phonetics
  • LING 304 Syntax I
  • LING 350 Structure of Words
  • LING 380 Sociology of Language
  • LING 402 Speech Science
  • LING 410 First Language Acquisition
  • LING 430 Phonetic and Phonological Disorders
  • LING 450 Audiology

Required Courses for All Literature, Writing, and Dramatic Literature Concentrators

  • ENL 290 Introduction to the Study of Literature
  • ENL 290 Introduction to the Study of Literature
  • ENL 300 British and American Literary Traditions
  • ENL 300 British and American Literary Traditions
  • ENL 310 World Literature in Contexts                                  
  • ENL 310 World Literature in Contexts

 LITERATURE

  • ENL 305 Critical Approaches to Children’s and Young Adult Literature (eve)
  • ENL 318 English Literature of the Renaissance (day)
  • ENL 321 South Asian Literature (day)
  • ENL 345 American Fiction Since WW II (day)
  • ENL 352 Major Twentieth-Century Poets
  • ENL 358 World Drama (day)
  • ENL 361 The Early Shakespeare (day)
  • ENL 368 Queer Studies (eve)
  • ENL 377 The African American Literary Tradition
  • ENL 379 Major English Author II (day)
  • ENL 381 Major American Author I (eve)
  • ENL 397 Global Literature (eve)

WRITING

  • ENL 267 Craft of Creative Writing (day) prerequisite
  • ENL 267 Craft of Creative Writing (eve) prerequisite
  • ENL 277 Journalism (eve)
  • ENL 370 Craft of Creative Nonfiction (day)
  • ENL 371 Craft of Fiction (day)
  • ENL 430 Creative Writing (day)
  • ENL 432 Poetry workshop (day)
  • ENL 435 Playwriting Workshop (eve)

LINGUISTICS

  • LING 101 Linguistic Diversity
  • LING 201 Introduction to Language
  • LING 201 Introduction to Language
  • LING 301 Introduction to Linguistics
  • LING 301 Introduction to Linguistics
  • LING 302 Phonetics
  • LING 304 Syntax I
  • LING 350 Structure of Words
  • LING 380 Sociology of Language
  • LING 402 Speech Science
  • LING 410 First Language Acquisition
  • LING 430 Phonetic and Phonological Disorders
  • LING 450 Audiology