Open menu button Close menu button

Study Abroad

CSI Fall 2022 Study Abroad virtual fair: Tuesday, September 13, 2022. Learn about study abroad opportunities worldwide. Virtual Fair on Zoom: https://bit.ly/CSIfall22Fair.

Click APPLY NOW to start your January Winter Intersession 2023, Spring 2023, and Summer 2023 study abroad application!

In January 2023, you can click APPLY NOW to start your Fall 2023 programs.​

Study Abroad Info Sessions
Interested in studying abroad soon? Join our Study Abroad Info Sessions every Tuesday at 2:30 pm. Click here to join our Zoom sessions this Fall!

Welcome to the CSI Study Abroad office!

Ready to have the best academic experience abroad?

Study Abroad Advisors are alternately at CSI on campus and working from home remotely.  We now have both in-person and virtual advising.  Please see study abroad advising hours or contact an advisor with the emails below.

You can come to the Center in 2A-206 for walk-in study abroad advising Monday through Friday 10:00 am - 4:00 pm.

Study Abroad Advisors are:


Click APPLY NOW above to start your January 2023, Spring 2023, and Summer 2023 study abroad application!

In January 2023, you can click APPLY NOW to start your Fall 2023 application.​

Contact Information

Study Abroad

2A-206
Email Study Abroad

Mon-Fri
10:00 am - 4:00 pm

The College of Staten Island (CSI) offers a wide range of study abroad and exchange programs. All of our study abroad programs enable you to explore both the traditions and the modern realities of the world from another perspective.

CSI's programs are open to all students at CSI, CUNY, and at other colleges and universities in the U.S. CSI is also a proud founding member of the College Consortium for International Studies (CCIS) offering programs throughout the world.

If you have a general question, please email studyab@csi.cuny.edu. For program specific inquiries, contact the advisor listed in each program page.

 

Programs Administered by CSI

CSI's programs are open to all students at CSI, CUNY, and at other colleges and universities in the US. CSI is also a proud founding member of the College Consortium for International Studies (CCIS) offering programs throughout the world.
 
For more information on CSI study abroad programs per country, please click here or use the map below to find our programs!.
 

Explore our Programs

 

 

Study Abroad Advisors are alternately at CSI on campus and working from home remotely.  We now have both in-person and virtual advising.  

You can come to the Center in 2A-206 for walk-in study abroad advising Monday through Friday 10:00 am - 4:00 pm.

Study Abroad Advisors are:

Programs Administered by other CCIS Member Schools

College Consortium for International Studies logoThe College of Staten Island, CUNY is a member of the College Consortium for International Studies (CCIS) whose mission is to provide a broad spectrum of quality international education opportunities abroad. CSI shares the CCIS vision of commitment to expanding opportunities for students to participate in high quality and affordable international education study abroad programs in diverse locations. The Center for Global Engagement at CSI shares the CCIS core values of excellence, affordability, accountability, participation, service, support, safety, advocacy, transparency and diversity.

For more information on these programs open to CSI students, please visit www.ccisabroad.org.

Programs Administered by other CUNY Colleges

CUNY LogoCollege of Staten Island students may apply for participation in a range of programs administered by other CUNY campuses. Most of these programs are offered during the January winter session and summer sessions, while some semester programs are also available. CSI students would apply directly to the host CUNY college for admission in the program, but must also complete a “2-page application form” and ultimately additional paperwork for course approval to register via the CUNY e-permit system with the Center for Global Engagement.

For more information on other CUNY programs open to CSI students, please visit www.cuny.edu/studyabroad.

 

If you are interested in a program that is not run through a CUNY campus or a CCIS member school, please contact the Center for Global Engagement (2A-206) at 718-982-2100 or StudyAB@csi.cuny.edu to discuss with a study abroad advisor.

Study Abroad Info Sessions - Fall 2022
Interested in studying abroad soon? Join our Study Abroad Info Sessions every Tuesday at 2:30 pm. Click here to join our Zoom sessions this Fall!

Tuesday, August 30, 2:30-3:20 (General Study Abroad)
Tuesday, September 6, 2:30-3:20 (Winter Sessions)
Wednesday, September 14, 2:30-3:20 (Exchange Abroad)
Tuesday, September 20, 2:30-3:20 (Winter Sessions)
Wednesday, September 28, 2:30-3:20 (General Study Abroad)
Wednesday, October 5, 2:30-3:20 (General Study Abroad)
Tuesday, October 11, 2:30-3:20 (Study in Italy)
Tuesday, October 18, 2:30-3:20 (Scholarships and Financing Study Abroad)

Tuesday, October 25, 2:30-3:20 (General Study Abroad)

Tuesday, November 1, 2:30-3:20 (General Study Abroad)

Tuesday, November 8, 2:30-3:20 (Study in Japan and China)

Tuesday, November 15, 2:30-3:20 (General Study Abroad)

Tuesday, November 29, 2:30-3:20 (General Study Abroad)

Tuesday, December 6, 2:30-3:20 (General Study Abroad)

1).  You may understand the value of study abroad, but if not, here are some key benefits you will gain by studying abroad:
 

  • You'll Get to Travel the Globe
  • You'll Expand Your Worldview
  • You’ll earn credit on your CSI transcript and in most cases your grades will figure into your cumulative GPA
  • You'll Impress Future Employers – build a global transcript and resume and experiences
  • You Might Learn a Foreign Language
  • You'll Learn How to Communicate with All Types of People
  • You Can Give Real-Life Context to Your Classroom Learning
  • You'll Make Lifelong Friends
  • You'll Gain Confidence and a Sense of Self-Reliance
  • You'll Become a Global Citizen

2).  If you know where you want to study overseas, and what you want to study, search programs and apply here: 

You can start to see your options at these links.  If you have decided and are ready, just click APPLY NOW!

3).   If you are not sure of where you want to study abroad, or don’t know your options, do these things: 

What Kind of Experience Do You Want to Have?
 
Create the experience you hope to have by thinking about the following: What would you like to study?  Where - what countries or regions?  Would you like to learn or practice a foreign language, or take courses taught in English?  Do you want to go abroad for a few weeks, a semester, or an academic year?  Would you like to interact more with local people or with other American students?  Are you interested in a program that offers a lot of support or would you like to be independent while abroad?  Remember that you can go abroad more than once prior to graduation and build on your previous experiences.
 

Attend a Study Abroad Fair
 
The Center for Global Engagement hosts a Study Abroad Fair every September and February. Fairs enable you to speak with sponsors of CSI, CUNY, and outside Study Abroad Programs providers, and to speak with past participants.  Fairs may be virtual or in-person.  See the Student Events calendar for exact dates and locations of the next Fair at CSI Connect: https://csi.campuslabs.com/engage/
 

Attend a Study Abroad CLUE Information Session
 
General information sessions are held most every Tuesday at 2:30 pm during the fall and spring terms.  They can be virtual or in-person. 
 

Note the Timeline for Study Abroad
 
Keep in mind study abroad application deadlines:
                    APPLICATION DEADLINE                  PROGRAM CYCLE/TERM
                    October 1 – (some October 15)         January Winter Intersession & Spring programs
                    March 1 – (some March 15)               Summer, Fall, & Academic Year programs

And this countdown to study abroad:

  • 12 - 6 months prior to the start of a program: Attend a study abroad information session.  Set an appointment with a study abroad advisor.
  • 12 - 5 months prior:  Research program options and talk with an academic adviser. Apply for or renew your passport.
  • 12 - 5 months prior:  Apply for scholarships and financial aid.
  • 6 - 4 months prior:  Choose a program and apply.
  • 5 - 3 months prior:  Complete and submit the post-acceptance material. Apply for a visa, if applicable.
  • 2 months prior:  Pay program tuition and fees. Check in with the Financial Aid Office.
  • 1 month prior:  Pack, prepare, and enjoy! 

Schedule a Study-Abroad advising appointment
 
To schedule a virtual Study Abroad Advising appointment, please do so via Navigate Student https://csi-cuny.navigate.eab.com/app/#/authentication/remote/ (desktop) or the Navigate Student app.  You can also set an in-person study abroad advising appointment.

Feel free to contact a CSI Study Abroad Advisor with any questions. Please contact
Russell Davis (russell.davis@csi.cuny.edu ) or John Dunleavy (john.dunleavy@csi.cuny.edu ).
 

Contact Past Study Abroad Participants
 
Contact the Center for Global Engagement to get in touch with students who are willing to talk with you about their experiences on particular programs.  Please also see alumni stories on our Dolphins across the Seven Seas - Study Abroad Blog - http://csistudyabroad.blogspot.com
 

Discuss Your Plan with an Academic Advisor
 
Once you have narrowed down your choices to a program or two, meet with your academic advisor or your major advisor to identify the courses you wish to take abroad that will fit your personal and academic goals. To give you the most freedom of choosing a program, you can plan to take only free elective credit abroad, though by limiting your search you can earn credit in your major or minor, to fulfill General Education requirements, pluralism and diversity, TALA, foreign language requirements, etc.  Along with your advisor, map out your course work to stay on track to graduate.
 

Research Program Options and Funding Opportunities
 
Talk with your friends and professors who have study abroad knowledge.   You can start to see your options at these links.  If you have decided and are ready, just click APPLY NOW!
o Search & apply to CSI programs - https://www.csi.cuny.edu/campus-life/student-services/center-global-engagement/study-abroad
o Search CUNY programs - https://www1.cuny.edu/sites/global/students/programs/
o Search CCIS programs - https://www.ccisabroad.org/

 
If you have not found a program that suits you from the sites above, you can check out programs on the Internet. While not always necessary, it is best/easiest to find programs that have US college sponsors, that will make getting credit at CSI easier.  Some excellent websites are:
•  GoAbroad.com
•  IIE Passport
•  Studyabroad.com
•  Browse the Internet. Search "study abroad" and the topic and/or region you're interested in exploring.
 

Get a Passport!
 
Apply now if you do not have a passport – in Summer 2022, the US St Dept says it now may take almost 3 months (8 -11 WEEKS) to get a US passportExpedited passports take 5 - 7 weeks.  Please apply ASAP as needed!  If you already have a passport, check to see that it is valid for at least 6 months after you return from abroad, and that it has blank pages for visas.  Otherwise, you must obtain a new passport or renew your passport. Learn more and apply for a passport at the U.S. Department of State website here.
 

Apply for Scholarships and Plan Your Financial Aid
 
Once you know the program(s) of interest, compare all program costs including tuition and fees or any program cost you might pay, housing, meals, international and local transportation, visas, personal expenses, etc., and create a budget for the total cost of your program.  Program costs can vary by location and duration, but financial aid and scholarships can offset a substantial part of these costs.  Research scholarships and financial aid information.  Click SCHOLARSHIPS on the CSI study abroad homepage here – https://www.csi.cuny.edu/campus-life/student-services/center-global-engagement/study-abroad .  Keep in mind all scholarship application deadlines – they are often earlier than study abroad program application deadlines.
 
If your plan to use financial aid, tell your student abroad advisor.  Your study abroad advisor will provide you an Overseas Expense Verification that breaks down all costs for the program you will attend, and you then share that with the financial aid advisor when you meet with them.  Visit a CSI financial aid advisor to know how your current aid applies and how to obtain additional aid. Identify scholarships and apply early. Make sure to complete your FAFSA by the Priority Deadline - January 31st Every Year - for assistance.
 

Choose a Program and Apply!
 
All students apply using the CSI study abroad online applications here:  https://www.csi.cuny.edu/campus-life/student-services/center-global-engagement/study-abroad

Just go to the CSI Program for your chosen program and click APPLY NOW to get started! 

And for CSI students only:
 

CSI students will also need to complete a program application with the sponsor if you are attending another CUNY college program, a CCIS program that is not sponsored by CSI, or any other Unaffiliated program.
 

Enjoy your rewarding study abroad experience!
 
(These steps are based on our process here at CSI, with ideas also from Brooklyn, Baruch, John Jay and Lehman Colleges. )

Financing your Study Abroad Experience with Scholarships!

Finding ways to fund your program abroad can seem like a challenge. One worth taking!  Although it will take some work, you should follow our guide below to look at some of the resources available to you.  Take action now and you’ll be eligible for more scholarships than you’d imagine.

Step 1: 

Are you a CSI student?  If so, keep reading.  If not, go to Step 3. 
Fill out a CSI Grant Application after you open an application to study abroad. You can learn more about the available scholarships for CSI students. Then make an appointment with an advisor at the Center for Global Engagement: [Studyab@csi.cuny.edu].

 

Step 2:

Visit Fellowships & Scholarships, open the link to the Fellowship & Scholarship Database, and make an appointment with Michele Callahan, CSI Fellowship and Scholarship Advisor, 718.982.2332, michele.callahan@csi.cuny.edu .

If you are a CSI student going on a College Consortium for International Studies (CCIS) program, you can view a complete list of CCIS and CCIS Program Scholarships here.

Step 3: 

Are you a CUNY (CSI too) student?  If so, keep reading, if not, go to Step 4. Visit www1.cuny.edu/sites/studyabroad/financial-matters/national-and-local-scholarships/chancellors-global-scholarship-cgs-for-study-abroad/ to learn about the Chancellor’s Global Scholarship (CGS) for Study Abroad.  Also visit CUNY’s scholarship page at: www2.cuny.edu/financial-aid/scholarships/.

Step 4: 

Check out these lists of resources and scholarships open to all students.

Dates will vary by scholarship - pay close attention so that you don't miss any deadlines.  Remember, the earlier you start the better chance you have of finding scholarships that meet your needs.  

 

Race and Ethnicity Abroad

Study abroad offers you the unique and exciting opportunity to learn about and interact with people of different cultures, backgrounds, and perspectives. In most cases, your interaction with host nationals will be among the most rewarding aspects of your experience abroad.

In some situations, however, your race, ethnicity or other identity anchors may be read or interpreted differently than you are accustomed to in the U.S. You may also encounter different cultural norms related to race and minority status, where racism and other forms of discrimination are performed, viewed, and addressed differently than you are used to.

You may find that your racial or ethnic identity is seen in a new way. Understanding how cultural differences can impact perceptions of race, ethnicity, and identity in an international context is an important component of your preparation to study abroad.

From your hair color to your passport nationality, differences in perceptions about your race, ethnicity, or other identity in the U.S. and in your host culture, may likely affect your experiences.  Some students may find themselves in a country where they are part of the majority race or ethnicity for the first time in their life, whereas others may find themselves as the minority for the first time. These interactions and differences in perception could result in a variety of potentially uncomfortable experiences, which may include:

  • Additional attention and possible staring
  • Fetishization and Objectification
  • Questioning from locals about where you’re from
  • Disbelief that you are American or reversely, stereotyping you as American
  • Possible discrimination or hurtful comments
  • Safety concerns (Note: if you are feeling unsafe while abroad, contact local authorities, your program provider, and/or the Center for Global Engagement)

As preparation for these potential experiences, we encourage you to chat with your study abroad advisors, and other on-campus faculty and advisors.  To help facilitate these conversations, we recommend considering some of these questions:

  • How might I be perceived in my host country?
  • Is it common for students of my race or ethnicity to experience discrimination in the country I’m studying in? Who can I talk to about it if I do?
  • What is the history of ethnic or racial tension in the country? Is the situation currently hostile to members of a minority race, majority race, or particular ethnicity or religion?
  • Are issues of racism/ethnic discrimination influenced by immigration in my host country? How do immigration concerns fuel racial tensions at home or in my host country?
  • Are there laws in the host country governing race relations? Ethnic relations? What protections are offered to ethnic or racial minorities? 

Additional resources:
 
ALLABROAD.us is a comprehensive site for students interested in diversity issues abroad. The site also provides specific advice for African Americans, Asian and Pacific Islander Americans, Hispanic and Latino Americans and Native Americans.

DiversityAbroad.com offers discussion forums, destination guides, student blogs, and a funding directory to assist students of diverse backgrounds. 

Diversity Issues in Study Abroad is a collection of Brown University student perspectives about diversity, identity and discrimination abroad.

Study Abroad Matters: Top 10 Reasons for African American Students to Study Abroad addresses the specific benefits to African American students of studying abroad.

Encounters of Another Color, by Stephanie Griffith, appeared in the New York Times and describes her experience as a black American student in Madrid, Spain. 

6 Things I Wish I Knew Before Studying Abroad as an African American - Go Overseas
 
Black Girls Abroad Blog - Black Girls Abroad
 
Dealing with Stereotypes Abroad - Diversity Abroad

African American Perspectives  - Go Abroad

Latinx Travelers' Perspectives  - Go Abroad

Asian Travelers' Perspectives  - Go Abroad
    
Arab-American Perspectives  - Go Abroad

Managing Black Hair Abroad - Diversity Abroad
 
Minority and Students of Color Abroad - Diversity Abroad
 
On Studying Abroad as a Person of Color: Don’t Believe Everything You Hear - Huffington Post
 
Resources to support Underrepresented Students - Project for Learning Abroad Training, and Outreach
 
Black Students Study Abroad: The Good, The Bad and The Weird - an overview of what you may expect and consider as a Black traveler and student abroad.
 

Studying Abroad As A Minority - things to consider for minority group members who study outside of the U.S.

Culture and Diversity Destination Guides - a variety of travel guides for specific countries. The Diversity & Inclusion Climate section provides information on how certain identities might be seen or treated in that country.

7 Things that only Latino Travelers Understand -  MatadorNetwork
 
Casual Racism in Travel  -  the award-winning travel blog “Oneika the Traveller”,
 
Traveling while Asian - blog

TWA: Traveling while Asian - Mixed Race American blog

Traveling as a Person of Color Is Stressful - Vice.com

Traveling while Arab – a NYT opinion article by Alaa Al Aswany

Traveling While Sikh - blog

Black and Abroad Podcast - recently recorded conversations about preparing for and undertaking study/travel abroad, and navigating Black identity outside the U.S.
 
Stamped Podcast - stories of study abroad & transformational travel from people of color

You may also find more helpful resources in the Heritage Seekers (going abroad to ancestral homelands) tab.

 

Ability and Accessibility Abroad

Supporting Students with Accommodation Needs

The CSI Center for Global Engagement encourages all students who meet program eligibility requirements to study abroad as part of their degree. If you want to study abroad and anticipate barriers to participation due to a disability or health concern, you should discuss your needs and concerns with a Study Abroad Advisor.  Your advisor can:

  • Coordinate with you, the Center for Student Accessibility (CSA), and program staff abroad to arrange reasonable accommodations that will meet your accommodation needs.
  • Work closely with you and your CSA counselor to identify program options that match your interests and fit your accommodation needs.
  • Provide additional resources based on your needs.

Although the CSI Center for Global Engagement cannot guarantee that any or all our program sites can accommodate your specific needs, we will do our best to work with you in finding options.  Please visit us and speak with a Study Abroad Advisor about programs that interest you.

Students should be prepared for a difference in how the concept of "disability" and “accessibility” may be culturally defined abroad. Local attitudes towards different individuals with disabilities and levels of accessibility can vary greatly from country to country.
 
Additional Resources:
 
A World Awaits You (AWAY) - Mobility International USA - a superb organization with countless resources for all kinds of ability and accessibility abroad. 

Resource Library - Mobility International USA

Google Maps Navigation for Individuals who Use Wheelchairs – Google

Guide to the World’s Wheelchair Accessible Destinations - Wheelchair Travel

Sharing the World from a Wheelchair User’s Perspective - Curb Free with Cory Lee

Step-by-Step Guide to Traveling With a Disability – Etias

Traveling Abroad with Medicine and with a Disability - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Country Regulations for Travellers Carrying Medicines Containing Controlled Substances - International Narcotics Control Board

Traveling with a Disability - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Traveling with Disabilities - U.S. Department of State

Welcome to ACCES-VR | Adult Career and Continuing Education Services | NYS Education Department – New York State Education Department

The National Clearinghouse on Disability & Exchange, an arm of Mobility International USA.  The website includes a database of disability organizations worldwide, tips for traveling with disabilities, free one-on-one consultations, and informational videos.
 
Access Abroad at the University of Minnesota study abroad website has some great information for their students with disabilities. The site provides information on how accommodations might differ abroad, medical and prescription needs, coping strategies, and tips from students who studied abroad with disabilities.
 
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website offers advice for travelers with disabilities including your rights when traveling by air, assistance and accommodations, service animals, and other useful links.
 

With these resources and some preparation, we hope we can help you build a rewarding study abroad experience into your college degree.  We encourage you to reach out to us and start exploring where and when you might study abroad.
 
Please feel free to contact us to set a study abroad advising appointment at the Center for Global Engagement.  We are advising in-person at CSI and virtually via Zoom.  See our contact info here: Advising Hours.
 

In addition, we encourage you to seek guidance and support at CSI from The Center for Student Accessibility:
 
Center for Student Accessibility
2800 Victory Boulevard
Room 1P-101
Staten Island, NY 10314
718-982-2510
csa@csi.cuny.edu

 

Heritage Seekers (going to ancestral homelands)

Many students choose to study abroad to learn more about their ancestry — these students are known as heritage seekers. The Institute of International Education has coined the term “heritage seeker” as a student who is drawn to study abroad in a particular country and culture “not because it is unfamiliar and new, but rather because it is somewhat familiar.”

The type of experience you will have abroad as a heritage seeker will be unique. Some students come home feeling very connected to their ancestral roots, while others return feeling more appreciative of their American roots. Either way, going abroad will give you a chance to learn more about your ancestral history and the culture today firsthand.

Going to your ancestral homeland can be a very emotional experience because you are choosing the location not just for the academics, but for personal reasons as well. Some students will be able to meet with relatives, while others will be connecting with their ancestral history or the language of their family through coursework.  Many students find that local community members have high expectations regarding the cultural knowledge and linguistic capabilities of heritage seeking students.

Heritage seekers, at times, have idealized views of their ancestral homes, so it is important to go into the country with an open mind.  You may be welcomed by the local community, but still considered an outsider.  Often in the U.S., people will ask about your ancestral background and someone will reply, “I’m Chinese and Thai.” or “ I’m Irish, French, and German.”, but abroad, you may likely be seen as an American.
Some Things to Consider:

  • How am I perceived in the US?
  • How will I be perceived in my destination country?
  • How should I react if I find something to be offensive?
  • How will it be if I become part of the majority abroad?
  • How will I handle it if relatives ask for money or other favors while I am there?
  • Will there be other heritage students in my program?
  • Will I be studying in the country my parents are from, perhaps not having ever been there before, and perhaps not speaking the language?
  • How might other parts of my identity affect my experience? 

Additional Resources

Tips for Heritage Seekers Traveling Abroad - DiversityAbroad
 
See 2 Georgetown student stories about heritage seeking abroad

7 Things that only Latino Travelers Understand - MatadorNetwork
 
Seeking your roots – A University of Texas studnets article about being a heritage student

Heritage, Culture, and Diaspora Seeker Resources – helpful resources compiled by UC Santa Cruz 

You may find more helpful resources in the Race and Ethnicity Abroad tab.

 

Jewish Students Abroad

Below are some resources to utilize for our Jewish students, particularly those who need a kosher experience when studying abroad. This is just a start on the resources available. Contact your advisor for program-specific information.
 

 

 

  • KAHAL: Your Jewish Home Abroad - Working closely with UJA Federations of New York and CUNY Hillels, KAHAL is a non-profit organization that will provide you with resources to enhance your experience. KAHAL connects Jewish students to Jewish communities abroad and provides them with resources to navigate Jewish life in a foreign country. They want to make sure each student is supported and has a positive experience abroad. The resources include information Internships, Volunteering, Shabbat and holiday experiences, and more. 

           Studying abroad and looking for High Holiday plans? Join a local community, host family, or use our awesome “DIY” resources
           to organize an event yourself with friends for Rosh Hashanah and join others in your city to break-the-fast on Yom Kippur.
           #SweetHomeAbroad
           @KahalAbroad  
           Check out KAHAL's Facebook page HERE.
 

  • Another source for finding out about kosher options abroad is Chabad.org, a global organization with more than 3,500 institutions worldwide. Often times, the local Chabad institution will have its own restaurant or meals and will usually have a page on its site dedicated to keeping kosher in that locale.

 

  • As the largest Jewish student organization in the world, Hillel builds connections with emerging adults at more than 550 colleges and universities in North America and inspires them to direct their own path.  During their formative college years, students are challenged to explore, experience, and create vibrant Jewish lives.  Hillel also has a Hillel Scholarships and Jewish Scholarships Portal.  There are more than 50 Hillels all over the world.

 

  • Jewish students may also want to explore opportunities offered by MasaThat can include finding funding to attend certain programs abroad.   

 
With these resources and some preparation, we hope we can help you build a rewarding study abroad experience into your college degree.  We encourage you to reach out to us and start exploring where and when you might study abroad.
 
Please feel free to contact us to set a study abroad advising appointment at the Center for Global Engagement.  We are advising in-person at CSI and virtually via Zoom.  See our contact info here: Advising Hours.
 

In addition, we encourage you to seek guidance and support at CSI from:
 
CSI Hillel Club
Hillel's mission is to enrich the lives of Jewish undergraduate and graduate students so that they may enrich the Jewish people and the world. Hillel seeks to inspire every Jewish student to make an enduring commitment to meaningful Jewish life and community. As members of the Multi-Faith Center at the College of Staten Island, we welcome the entire campus community and strive to be valuable partners in CSI's vibrant and diverse student experience. As a Jewish organization on Staten Island, we are committed and collaborative partners in the community, helping to make Staten Island a great place to live, work, and study.
 
For more information, please contact
     Amy Posner, Executive Director, Hillel at CSI, Inc.
     718.982.3006
     amy.posner@csi.cuny.edu
     Multifaith Center
     1C-212

Religion and Spirituality Abroad

Religion is an important aspect of many cultures, and study abroad can expose you to a variety of different belief systems. Whether you practice a religion or not, it is important to understand your beliefs in the context of your future host country’s religious culture and the role religion plays in daily life.
 
We recommend these tips when abroad:

  • Research your destination’s religious tolerance levels.
  • If you plan to worship abroad, research availability of worship locations for your faith and the safety of these locations.
  • Use the local religion as a lens to the local culture. Some cultures may welcome you to attend local services, even if you do not believe in the faith.
  • Know the local laws concerning religion and, especially, as this relates to anything that may appear to be proselytizing. In some cultures, for instance, even a religious necklace could be considered proselytizing.
  • Demonstrate respect- wear appropriate attire, show proper respect to icons, etc.  If you do not know what is appropriate, ask. 

Additional resources:
 
Religious Diversity Abroad - Diversity Abroad
 
Religious and Spiritual Group Resources Abroad - George Washington University
 
International Religious Freedom Report - U.S. Department of State
 
Guide to Finding a Buddhist Center or Organization - World Buddhist Directory
 
Christian International Church Finder
 
Christianity Today International
 
Guide to Finding Mosques and Islamic Institutions – Salatomatic
 
Halal Travel - Halal Trip
 
Resources for Muslim Students - Have Halal Will Travel
 
IslamiCity - is a source of Islamic information and a large e-Muslim community

IslamicFinder - resources for navigating daily life
 
Federation of Student Islamic Societies
 

See resources for Jewish Students Abroad in a separate TAB.

Veteran Students and GI Bill Recipients

Here are some resources that can help you with study abroad:
 
Gilman-McCain Scholarship for child dependents of active-duty service members to study or intern abroad on credit-bearing programs

Foreign Programs - U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs

How to Use Your GI Bill to Study Abroad - Go Abroad
 
Gi Bill Study Abroad Fact Sheet – U.S. Government Department of Veteran Affairs
 
The Ultimate Study Abroad Advice for Veterans and ROTC Members - Go Abroad

Veteran Students and GI Bill Recipients – a resource page at UC Santa Cruz

 
With these resources and some preparation, we hope we can help you build a rewarding study abroad experience into your college degree.  We encourage you to reach out to us and start exploring where and when you might study abroad.
 
Please feel free to contact us to set a study abroad advising appointment at the Center for Global Engagement.  We are advising in-person at CSI and virtually via Zoom.  See our contact info here: Advising Hours.
 
 
We also encourage you to reach out for advice and support to:
 
CSI Veterans Support Services
Veterans Support Services 1C-216
(718) 982-3108
Deborah Lloret
Veteran Support Staff
Email: deborah.lloret@csi.cuny.edu

 

SIT's Diversity Resources by Global Region

For a wide variety of resources for equality, diversity, and inclusion based on specific countries and regions of the world, see the School for International Training's equity, diversity, and inclusion Resources by Region with links for:

  • Latin America,
  • Africa South of the Sahara,
  • Asia & the Pacific,
  • Middle East & North Africa, and
  • Europe. 

Just scroll down the page and look for “Resources by Region”, and click open each section to see regional links on all kinds of topics.

Please feel free to contact us to set a study abroad advising appointment at the Center for Global Engagement.  We are advising in-person at CSI and virtually via Zoom.  See our contact info here: Advising Hours.

Resources for Diversity and Inclusion Abroad

The Center for Global Engagement at CSI is committed to nondiscrimination, diversity, and inclusion to support you and all students (and faculty and staff) through our services, activities, and programs.  In that spirit of inclusive excellence, we share here information and resources that can be useful for you and all students (and faculty and staff) when learning about global culture and travel and when participating in study abroad programs.  Please read about:

  • First Generation College Students Abroad
  • Women Abroad
  • LGBTQ+ Abroad
  • Race and Ethnicity Abroad
  • Ability and Accessibility Abroad
  • Heritage Seekers (going abroad to ancestral homelands)
  • Jewish Students Abroad
  • Religion and Spirituality Abroad
  • Veterans and GI Bill Recipients
  • SIT's Diversity Resources by Global Region. 

There are many reasons to study abroad: expand your horizons, gain a global perspective on your major and studies, build a global resume that will help you throughout your academic and professional career, learn first-hand about a culture, people, and their language, have life changing and life affirming experiences that you will treasure your entire life, and more...
 
With these resources and some preparation, we hope we can help you build a rewarding study abroad experience into your college degree.  We encourage you to reach out to us and start exploring where and when you might study abroad.
 
Please feel free to contact us to set a study abroad advising appointment at the Center for Global Engagement.  We can advise you in-person at CSI or advise you via Zoom virtually. 

NOTE:  These Diversity and Inclusion sections, draw on study abroad resources at CSI and CUNY, and also NAFSA: The Association of International Educators, the School for International Training, Michigan State University, UC Santa Cruz, George Washington University, University of Washington, among other schools, and third party providers of study abroad programs.

First Generation College Students Abroad

As one of the first in your family to attend college, you may never have considered going abroad or you may have believed that the process would be too daunting.  You should know that your path to college and your experiences at CSI have already given you many skills that will help you on your study abroad journey. The Center for Global Engagement is here to guide you along the way and answer any questions you may have.  We encourage you to reach out and set an appointment with a Study Abroad Advisor to learn about your options.

Here are some additional resources:

Women Abroad

Women make up the majority of U.S. college study abroad students, accounting for up to 65+% of U.S. students abroad annually. Though many women have successful experiences abroad each year, women travelers may face greater obstacles when traveling due to differences in their host country’s cultural values, attitudes, and behaviors toward women.
 
It is important to understand your host country's gender norms to help set yourself up for success. Many foreigners' perceptions of American women, especially, are influenced by media portrayals. The way you dress or act abroad can reinforce or detract from these stereotypes. Remember that your dress and body language may be commonplace in the U.S. but, in your future host country, your actions may draw unwanted attention. You may find that cultural norms in the U.S. are more liberal or allow for more informality, than many host countries that may be more conservative or formal, or tradition-bound.
 
Talk with your Study Abroad Advisor and do research before you go to gain a better understanding of your host country.  In preparation for your time abroad, consider some of these safety tips:

  • Review your host country’s women-specific laws. In some countries, women do not have the same rights or may be held accountable even when they are the victim of a crime.
  • Maintain situational awareness at all times.
  • Understand cultural norms for attire, body language, behavior, and friendship.
  • Use the buddy system whenever possible. 

Additional resources:

LGBTQ+ Resources for Study Abroad

 

The Center for Global Engagement at CSI is committed to nondiscrimination, diversity, and inclusion to support you and all students (and faculty and staff) through our services, activities, and programs. In that spirit of inclusive excellence, we share here LGBTQ+ information and resources that can be useful for you and all students (and faculty and staff) when learning about global culture and travel and when participating in study abroad programs.

 

There are many reasons to study abroad: expand your horizons, gain a global perspective on your major and studies, build a global resume that will help you throughout your academic and professional career, learn first-hand about a culture, people, and their language, have life changing and life affirming experiences that you will treasure your entire life, and more...

 

Here are at least 10 Reasons Why LGBTQ+ Students Should Study Abroad – written by a Carleton College student some years ago

 

Challenges

 

One of the main challenges all students may face when studying abroad entails adjusting to the cultural norms in each country abroad. Likewise, one of the main challenges LGBTQ+ students may face entails adjusting to the LGBTQ+ cultural norms in each country abroad. Of course, being aware of the legal LGBTQ+ landscape in a country is imperative. Several resources listed below describe the legal and cultural LGBTQ+ climate in other countries.

 

Some cultures may not recognize LGBTQ+ identities in the same way as we’ve come to in the

U.S. Or perhaps they’ll use different words to describe similar concepts. At times, this may result in a seeming invalidation of U.S. perspectives on LGBTQ+ topics, which can be disheartening for LGBTQ+ students that are likely to have had similar experiences with outright homophobia and transphobia in the U.S.

 

A more open society will be more progressive about LGBTQ+ rights than a less tolerant society, however students can expect to have more culturally nuanced experiences. The Fa'afafine community in American Samoa, identifying themselves as third-gender, provides a concrete example of how gender identity is approached very differently in another culture.

 

One unexpected cultural phenomenon some students have experienced has to do with studying abroad in collective societies. Since the U.S. is a very individualistic society, individual expression is valued, whereas in many collective societies, individual expression is more frowned upon. A student with an American cultural background may initially perceive a lack of expressive diversity in the culture, when in reality this expression ties greatly to the collective culture nature of the society. In Asia, for example, there is a great emphasis in the culture on the collective and the group, as opposed to the focus on the individual in the U.S. Similarly, U.S. culture can often generally be seen more informal, when compared to cultures in many

 

countries across the globe, where traditions, formality, and more rigid societal structures seem to be more fixed and less fluid. Where possible, try to learn about the linguistic and conceptual differences between LGBTQ+ topics in the U.S. and in the culture of your chosen study abroad location.

 

Studying abroad while transgender or non-binary might present its own challenges, but we encourage you to take the leap. No matter where you are in your transition, experiencing another country and culture can have a huge impact on your life. While studying abroad you will have the space to be yourself and further explore how you identify in the world. There may also be opportunities to connect with other gender diverse people that can give you insight into their unique experiences. With some preparation, trans and non-binary students can have a

life-changing experience. We encourage you to reach out to us and start exploring where you might study abroad.

 

Safety

 

Safety concerns for LGBTQ+ students will vary from country to country and city to city. Homophobia and transphobia are not unique to any country, but rates of violence against LGBTQ+ individuals should be factored into your research of programs that interest you. It is important for you to be aware of any legislation restricting gender presentation and/or sexual activity among same-gender individuals in your countries of interest.

 

The legal status of same-gender marriage and sex are often metrics used to judge the openness of a society. You are encouraged to learn and explore the social climate and local conditions of your chosen country of interest using the recourses links below and to ask questions about LGBTQ+ safety abroad issues with your Study Abroad Advisor. If your Advisor does not know the answers, they will be sure to find resources that can help answer questions and concerns you may have.

 

According to their website, the ILGA – the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association – is the world federation of national and local organizations dedicated to achieving equal rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex (LGBTI) people. The organization offers maps and sexual orientation laws for countries the world over, in addition to other resources and data, and is a strong resource for up-to-date information.

 

Preparing for study abroad

 

  • Rather than trying to narrow down a possible program list based on LGBTQ+-friendly locations, consider first looking at all programs and think about and work with your Study Abroad Advisor to decide what experience is best for you, given your goals and expectations
  • Onsite staff will provide host-country information to help students acclimate to life abroad. Your Study Abroad Advisor will work with onsite staff to help ensure they have LGBTQ+ knowledge and can provide support, or at least can direct you to resources that

 

may be available. Some onsite staff may understand the U.S. context that students bring with them.

  • Your Study Abroad Advisor most importantly wants to support your wishes. Please let your advisor know whether you would like to be out to colleagues, host families, or students or if you would like to keep your identities private.
  • Please let your Study Abroad Advisor know which gender you would prefer to have for roommates where possible. Also, many programs may allow for single-accommodation housing if you so choose.
  • Use resource links below to investigate and understand the LGBTQ+ climate of the foreign countries you are considering.
  • Feel free to ask questions about this and more to your Study Abroad Advisor

 

Please contact us to set a study abroad advising appointment at the Center for Global Engagement. See our contact info in the Resources for Diversity and Inclusion Abroad tab.

 

Resources for LGBTQ+ Study Abroad Students:

Additional resources:

Travel:

 

Using Names and Pronouns:

 

LGBTQ+ student study abroad stories:

6 Students Share Their LGBTQ++ Study Abroad Experience – IES Abroad

More stories written by students about LGBTQ+ study abroad are on IFSA-Butler’s site - Unpacked: A Study Abroad Guide for Students Like Me.

Specifically, the LGBTQ+ section

 

Scholarships:

At CSI:

LGBTQ Resource Center Office of Student Life

If you have any questions, please reach out to:

Jeremiah Jurkiewicz (He/Him/His) Jeremiah.Jurkiewicz@csi.cuny.edu

LGBTQ Resource Center/Pluralism & Diversity Coordinator Office of Student Life, College of Staten Island, 1C-226 718-982-3091

Instagram/Twitter: @CSILGBTQ Facebook: CSI LGBTQ Resource Center

Follow Student Life!

Insta: https://www.instagram.com/csi_studentlife/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CSIStudentLife

FB: https://www.facebook.com/CSIOfficeofStudentLife/

CSI Connect: https://csi.campuslabs.com/engage/

 

At CUNY:

Here is a link to a new CUNY resource: CUNY Launches New Initiatives to Support LGBTQ+I+ Students

CUNY’s LGBTQ+I+ Council, a CUNY-wide committee of faculty and staff, also created a one-stop online tool, the Hub, collecting available resources in one centralized location and sending the message that CUNY is a safe environment in which to thrive. The Council’s mission is to ensure the visibility and inclusion of the entire spectrum of LGBTQ+I+ students, faculty, and staff.

NYC Resources:

The 2021 LGBTQ+ Guide of Services and Resources from the Office of NYC Comptroller Scott M. Stringer.

Race and Ethnicity Abroad

Study abroad offers you the unique and exciting opportunity to learn about and interact with people of different cultures, backgrounds, and perspectives. In most cases, your interaction with host nationals will be among the most rewarding aspects of your experience abroad.

In some situations, however, your race, ethnicity or other identity anchors may be read or interpreted differently than you are accustomed to in the U.S. You may also encounter different cultural norms related to race and minority status, where racism and other forms of discrimination are performed, viewed, and addressed differently than you are used to.

You may find that your racial or ethnic identity is seen in a new way. Understanding how cultural differences can impact perceptions of race, ethnicity, and identity in an international context is an important component of your preparation to study abroad.

From your hair color to your passport nationality, differences in perceptions about your race, ethnicity, or other identity in the U.S. and in your host culture, may likely affect your experiences.  Some students may find themselves in a country where they are part of the majority race or ethnicity for the first time in their life, whereas others may find themselves as the minority for the first time. These interactions and differences in perception could result in a variety of potentially uncomfortable experiences, which may include:

  • Additional attention and possible staring
  • Fetishization and Objectification
  • Questioning from locals about where you’re from
  • Disbelief that you are American or reversely, stereotyping you as American
  • Possible discrimination or hurtful comments
  • Safety concerns (Note: if you are feeling unsafe while abroad, contact local authorities, your program provider, and/or the Center for Global Engagement)

As preparation for these potential experiences, we encourage you to chat with your study abroad advisors, and other on-campus faculty and advisors.  To help facilitate these conversations, we recommend considering some of these questions:

  • How might I be perceived in my host country?
  • Is it common for students of my race or ethnicity to experience discrimination in the country I’m studying in? Who can I talk to about it if I do?
  • What is the history of ethnic or racial tension in the country? Is the situation currently hostile to members of a minority race, majority race, or particular ethnicity or religion?
  • Are issues of racism/ethnic discrimination influenced by immigration in my host country? How do immigration concerns fuel racial tensions at home or in my host country?
  • Are there laws in the host country governing race relations? Ethnic relations? What protections are offered to ethnic or racial minorities? 

Additional resources:
 
ALLABROAD.us is a comprehensive site for students interested in diversity issues abroad. The site also provides specific advice for African Americans, Asian and Pacific Islander Americans, Hispanic and Latino Americans and Native Americans.

DiversityAbroad.com offers discussion forums, destination guides, student blogs, and a funding directory to assist students of diverse backgrounds. 

Diversity Issues in Study Abroad is a collection of Brown University student perspectives about diversity, identity and discrimination abroad.

Study Abroad Matters: Top 10 Reasons for African American Students to Study Abroad addresses the specific benefits to African American students of studying abroad.

Encounters of Another Color, by Stephanie Griffith, appeared in the New York Times and describes her experience as a black American student in Madrid, Spain. 

6 Things I Wish I Knew Before Studying Abroad as an African American - Go Overseas
 
Black Girls Abroad Blog - Black Girls Abroad
 
Dealing with Stereotypes Abroad - Diversity Abroad

African American Perspectives  - Go Abroad

Latinx Travelers' Perspectives  - Go Abroad

Asian Travelers' Perspectives  - Go Abroad
    
Arab-American Perspectives  - Go Abroad

Managing Black Hair Abroad - Diversity Abroad
 
Minority and Students of Color Abroad - Diversity Abroad
 
On Studying Abroad as a Person of Color: Don’t Believe Everything You Hear - Huffington Post
 
Resources to support Underrepresented Students - Project for Learning Abroad Training, and Outreach
 
Black Students Study Abroad: The Good, The Bad and The Weird - an overview of what you may expect and consider as a Black traveler and student abroad.
 

Studying Abroad As A Minority - things to consider for minority group members who study outside of the U.S.

Culture and Diversity Destination Guides - a variety of travel guides for specific countries. The Diversity & Inclusion Climate section provides information on how certain identities might be seen or treated in that country.

7 Things that only Latino Travelers Understand -  MatadorNetwork
 
Casual Racism in Travel  -  the award-winning travel blog “Oneika the Traveller”,
 
Traveling while Asian - blog

TWA: Traveling while Asian - Mixed Race American blog

Traveling as a Person of Color Is Stressful - Vice.com

Traveling while Arab – a NYT opinion article by Alaa Al Aswany

Traveling While Sikh - blog

Black and Abroad Podcast - recently recorded conversations about preparing for and undertaking study/travel abroad, and navigating Black identity outside the U.S.
 
Stamped Podcast - stories of study abroad & transformational travel from people of color

You may also find more helpful resources in the Heritage Seekers (going abroad to ancestral homelands) tab.

Ability and Accessibility Abroad

Supporting Students with Accommodation Needs

The CSI Center for Global Engagement encourages all students who meet program eligibility requirements to study abroad as part of their degree. If you want to study abroad and anticipate barriers to participation due to a disability or health concern, you should discuss your needs and concerns with a Study Abroad Advisor.  Your advisor can:

  • Coordinate with you, the Center for Student Accessibility (CSA), and program staff abroad to arrange reasonable accommodations that will meet your accommodation needs.
  • Work closely with you and your CSA counselor to identify program options that match your interests and fit your accommodation needs.
  • Provide additional resources based on your needs.

Although the CSI Center for Global Engagement cannot guarantee that any or all our program sites can accommodate your specific needs, we will do our best to work with you in finding options.  Please visit us and speak with a Study Abroad Advisor about programs that interest you.

Students should be prepared for a difference in how the concept of "disability" and “accessibility” may be culturally defined abroad. Local attitudes towards different individuals with disabilities and levels of accessibility can vary greatly from country to country.
 
Additional Resources:
 
A World Awaits You (AWAY) - Mobility International USA - a superb organization with countless resources for all kinds of ability and accessibility abroad. 

Resource Library - Mobility International USA

Google Maps Navigation for Individuals who Use Wheelchairs – Google

Guide to the World’s Wheelchair Accessible Destinations - Wheelchair Travel

Sharing the World from a Wheelchair User’s Perspective - Curb Free with Cory Lee

Step-by-Step Guide to Traveling With a Disability – Etias

Traveling Abroad with Medicine and with a Disability - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Country Regulations for Travellers Carrying Medicines Containing Controlled Substances - International Narcotics Control Board

Traveling with a Disability - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Traveling with Disabilities - U.S. Department of State

Welcome to ACCES-VR | Adult Career and Continuing Education Services | NYS Education Department – New York State Education Department

The National Clearinghouse on Disability & Exchange, an arm of Mobility International USA.  The website includes a database of disability organizations worldwide, tips for traveling with disabilities, free one-on-one consultations, and informational videos.
 
Access Abroad at the University of Minnesota study abroad website has some great information for their students with disabilities. The site provides information on how accommodations might differ abroad, medical and prescription needs, coping strategies, and tips from students who studied abroad with disabilities.
 
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website offers advice for travelers with disabilities including your rights when traveling by air, assistance and accommodations, service animals, and other useful links.
 

With these resources and some preparation, we hope we can help you build a rewarding study abroad experience into your college degree.  We encourage you to reach out to us and start exploring where and when you might study abroad.
 
Please feel free to contact us to set a study abroad advising appointment at the Center for Global Engagement.  We are advising in-person at CSI and virtually via Zoom.  See our contact info here: Advising Hours.
 

In addition, we encourage you to seek guidance and support at CSI from The Center for Student Accessibility:
 
Center for Student Accessibility
2800 Victory Boulevard
Room 1P-101
Staten Island, NY 10314
718-982-2510
csa@csi.cuny.edu

Heritage Seekers (going to ancestral homelands)

Many students choose to study abroad to learn more about their ancestry — these students are known as heritage seekers. The Institute of International Education has coined the term “heritage seeker” as a student who is drawn to study abroad in a particular country and culture “not because it is unfamiliar and new, but rather because it is somewhat familiar.”

The type of experience you will have abroad as a heritage seeker will be unique. Some students come home feeling very connected to their ancestral roots, while others return feeling more appreciative of their American roots. Either way, going abroad will give you a chance to learn more about your ancestral history and the culture today firsthand.

Going to your ancestral homeland can be a very emotional experience because you are choosing the location not just for the academics, but for personal reasons as well. Some students will be able to meet with relatives, while others will be connecting with their ancestral history or the language of their family through coursework.  Many students find that local community members have high expectations regarding the cultural knowledge and linguistic capabilities of heritage seeking students.

Heritage seekers, at times, have idealized views of their ancestral homes, so it is important to go into the country with an open mind.  You may be welcomed by the local community, but still considered an outsider.  Often in the U.S., people will ask about your ancestral background and someone will reply, “I’m Chinese and Thai.” or “ I’m Irish, French, and German.”, but abroad, you may likely be seen as an American.
Some Things to Consider:

  • How am I perceived in the US?
  • How will I be perceived in my destination country?
  • How should I react if I find something to be offensive?
  • How will it be if I become part of the majority abroad?
  • How will I handle it if relatives ask for money or other favors while I am there?
  • Will there be other heritage students in my program?
  • Will I be studying in the country my parents are from, perhaps not having ever been there before, and perhaps not speaking the language?
  • How might other parts of my identity affect my experience? 

Additional Resources

Tips for Heritage Seekers Traveling Abroad - DiversityAbroad
 
See 2 Georgetown student stories about heritage seeking abroad

7 Things that only Latino Travelers Understand - MatadorNetwork
 
Seeking your roots – A University of Texas studnets article about being a heritage student

Heritage, Culture, and Diaspora Seeker Resources – helpful resources compiled by UC Santa Cruz 

You may find more helpful resources in the Race and Ethnicity Abroad tab.

Jewish Students Abroad

Below are some resources to utilize for our Jewish students, particularly those who need a kosher experience when studying abroad. This is just a start on the resources available. Contact your advisor for program-specific information.
 

 

 

  • KAHAL: Your Jewish Home Abroad - Working closely with UJA Federations of New York and CUNY Hillels, KAHAL is a non-profit organization that will provide you with resources to enhance your experience. KAHAL connects Jewish students to Jewish communities abroad and provides them with resources to navigate Jewish life in a foreign country. They want to make sure each student is supported and has a positive experience abroad. The resources include information Internships, Volunteering, Shabbat and holiday experiences, and more. 

           Studying abroad and looking for High Holiday plans? Join a local community, host family, or use our awesome “DIY” resources
           to organize an event yourself with friends for Rosh Hashanah and join others in your city to break-the-fast on Yom Kippur.
           #SweetHomeAbroad
           @KahalAbroad  
           Check out KAHAL's Facebook page HERE.
 

  • Another source for finding out about kosher options abroad is Chabad.org, a global organization with more than 3,500 institutions worldwide. Often times, the local Chabad institution will have its own restaurant or meals and will usually have a page on its site dedicated to keeping kosher in that locale.

 

  • As the largest Jewish student organization in the world, Hillel builds connections with emerging adults at more than 550 colleges and universities in North America and inspires them to direct their own path.  During their formative college years, students are challenged to explore, experience, and create vibrant Jewish lives.  Hillel also has a Hillel Scholarships and Jewish Scholarships Portal.  There are more than 50 Hillels all over the world.

 

  • Jewish students may also want to explore opportunities offered by MasaThat can include finding funding to attend certain programs abroad.   

 
With these resources and some preparation, we hope we can help you build a rewarding study abroad experience into your college degree.  We encourage you to reach out to us and start exploring where and when you might study abroad.
 
Please feel free to contact us to set a study abroad advising appointment at the Center for Global Engagement.  We are advising in-person at CSI and virtually via Zoom.  See our contact info here: Advising Hours.
 

In addition, we encourage you to seek guidance and support at CSI from:
 
CSI Hillel Club
Hillel's mission is to enrich the lives of Jewish undergraduate and graduate students so that they may enrich the Jewish people and the world. Hillel seeks to inspire every Jewish student to make an enduring commitment to meaningful Jewish life and community. As members of the Multi-Faith Center at the College of Staten Island, we welcome the entire campus community and strive to be valuable partners in CSI's vibrant and diverse student experience. As a Jewish organization on Staten Island, we are committed and collaborative partners in the community, helping to make Staten Island a great place to live, work, and study.
 
For more information, please contact
     Amy Posner, Executive Director, Hillel at CSI, Inc.
     718.982.3006
     amy.posner@csi.cuny.edu
     Multifaith Center
     1C-212

Religion and Spirituality Abroad

Religion is an important aspect of many cultures, and study abroad can expose you to a variety of different belief systems. Whether you practice a religion or not, it is important to understand your beliefs in the context of your future host country’s religious culture and the role religion plays in daily life.
 
We recommend these tips when abroad:

  • Research your destination’s religious tolerance levels.
  • If you plan to worship abroad, research availability of worship locations for your faith and the safety of these locations.
  • Use the local religion as a lens to the local culture. Some cultures may welcome you to attend local services, even if you do not believe in the faith.
  • Know the local laws concerning religion and, especially, as this relates to anything that may appear to be proselytizing. In some cultures, for instance, even a religious necklace could be considered proselytizing.
  • Demonstrate respect- wear appropriate attire, show proper respect to icons, etc.  If you do not know what is appropriate, ask. 

Additional resources:
 
Religious Diversity Abroad - Diversity Abroad
 
Religious and Spiritual Group Resources Abroad - George Washington University
 
International Religious Freedom Report - U.S. Department of State
 
Guide to Finding a Buddhist Center or Organization - World Buddhist Directory
 
Christian International Church Finder
 
Christianity Today International
 
Guide to Finding Mosques and Islamic Institutions – Salatomatic
 
Halal Travel - Halal Trip
 
Resources for Muslim Students - Have Halal Will Travel
 
IslamiCity - is a source of Islamic information and a large e-Muslim community

IslamicFinder - resources for navigating daily life
 
Federation of Student Islamic Societies
 

See resources for Jewish Students Abroad in a separate TAB.

Veteran Students and GI Bill Recipients

Here are some resources that can help you with study abroad:
 
Gilman-McCain Scholarship for child dependents of active-duty service members to study or intern abroad on credit-bearing programs

Foreign Programs - U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs

How to Use Your GI Bill to Study Abroad - Go Abroad
 
Gi Bill Study Abroad Fact Sheet – U.S. Government Department of Veteran Affairs
 
The Ultimate Study Abroad Advice for Veterans and ROTC Members - Go Abroad

Veteran Students and GI Bill Recipients – a resource page at UC Santa Cruz

 
With these resources and some preparation, we hope we can help you build a rewarding study abroad experience into your college degree.  We encourage you to reach out to us and start exploring where and when you might study abroad.
 
Please feel free to contact us to set a study abroad advising appointment at the Center for Global Engagement.  We are advising in-person at CSI and virtually via Zoom.  See our contact info here: Advising Hours.
 
 
We also encourage you to reach out for advice and support to:
 
CSI Veterans Support Services
Veterans Support Services 1C-216
(718) 982-3108
Deborah Lloret
Veteran Support Staff
Email: deborah.lloret@csi.cuny.edu

SIT's Diversity Resources by Global Region

For a wide variety of resources for equality, diversity, and inclusion based on specific countries and regions of the world, see the School for International Training's equity, diversity, and inclusion Resources by Region with links for:

  • Latin America,
  • Africa South of the Sahara,
  • Asia & the Pacific,
  • Middle East & North Africa, and
  • Europe. 

Just scroll down the page and look for “Resources by Region”, and click open each section to see regional links on all kinds of topics.

Please feel free to contact us to set a study abroad advising appointment at the Center for Global Engagement.  We are advising in-person at CSI and virtually via Zoom.  See our contact info here: Advising Hours.